Hippomedon


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Hippomedon

(hĭpŏm`ədŏn): see Seven against ThebesSeven against Thebes,
in Greek legend, seven heroes—Polynices, Adrastus, Amphiaraüs, Hippomedon, Capaneus, Tydeus, and Parthenopaeus—who made war on Eteocles, king of Thebes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The second postgraduate article by Kyle Conrau-Lewis (Yale University), 'The Perversion of Virtue: a case study of Statius' Hippomedon', examines Statius' Thebaid in the context of an apparently minor character, Hippomedon.
Like Zethos in the celebrated debate of the later Antiope, Hippomedon avoids poetry and the soft life, preferring vigorous physical activities in a rural setting, thus fitting himself for active soldiery in the service of his city.(77) Parthenopaios offers yet another type of civic virtue, one suitable for the noncitizen or metic: although not born at Argos, he lived there in peace and harmony.(78) The beauty of Parthenopaios (889) offered him special challenges and temptations, to which he responded with the same restraint that he brought to his role as metic.(79) The passage describing Tydeus is textually confused, but 903-6 seem the most specifically suited to context:(80) Tydeus, a second Zethos figure, is provided with an Amphion.
(10) Adrastos also describes Hippomedon and Parthenopaios in terms of their early life and rearing: 882, [Characters Omitted] and 891, [Characters Omitted].
Their force was led by seven champions: Adrastus; his brother - in - law, the seer Amphiaraus, who foresaw that only Adrastus would survive the war; Adrastus ' son - in - law Tydeus, a hero from Calydon; Parthenopaeus; Hippomedon; Capaneus; and Polynices (though some accounts add the Argives Mecisteus and Eteoclus in place of the foreign leaders, Polynices and Tydeus).
Hippomedon is perhaps the most minor of the seven heroes of Statius' Thebaid.
It is very easy to see Hippomedon in the Thebaid merely as an exemplum of furor and impietas ('fury' and 'impiety'), a straightforward recapitulation of the major themes of the epic.
Perhaps even more disturbing is the extent to which Hippomedon is a good character.
Hippomedon first enters the narrative at 4.129 leading contingents from Pylos and Dyme.
Kyle Conrau-Lewis' 'Family Trees in the Thebaid: The Missing Links' examines Statius' inconsistent treatment of genealogy in the Thebaid and argues that it is a significant aspect of the characterisation of the seven heroes: Adrastus, Polynices, Tydeus, Amphiaraus, Parthenopoeus, Hippomedon and Capaneus.
This paper examines the lineages of the seven heroes against Thebes as given in the Thebaid: Adrastus, Polynices, Tydeus, Amphiaraus, Parthenopaeus, Hippomedon and Capaneus.
In the case of Hippomedon and Capaneus, no parentage is given, though Statius vaguely alludes to them having noble families.
After Hippomedon wins the discus, Adrastus then orders the victory prize to go to him.