Hippomedon


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Hippomedon

(hĭpŏm`ədŏn): see Seven against ThebesSeven against Thebes,
in Greek legend, seven heroes—Polynices, Adrastus, Amphiaraüs, Hippomedon, Capaneus, Tydeus, and Parthenopaeus—who made war on Eteocles, king of Thebes.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
The author argues that Hippomedon is vital to Statius' depiction of a morally perverse world, as he exemplifies moral irrelevance and perversion in his contradictory personal qualities.
Like Zethos in the celebrated debate of the later Antiope, Hippomedon avoids poetry and the soft life, preferring vigorous physical activities in a rural setting, thus fitting himself for active soldiery in the service of his city.
10) Adrastos also describes Hippomedon and Parthenopaios in terms of their early life and rearing: 882, [Characters Omitted] and 891, [Characters Omitted].
Hippomedon is perhaps the most minor of the seven heroes of Statius' Thebaid.
It is very easy to see Hippomedon in the Thebaid merely as an exemplum of furor and impietas ('fury' and 'impiety'), a straightforward recapitulation of the major themes of the epic.
Perhaps even more disturbing is the extent to which Hippomedon is a good character.
Disturbingly Hippomedon bears the image of the Danaids on his shield at 4.
Kyle Conrau-Lewis' 'Family Trees in the Thebaid: The Missing Links' examines Statius' inconsistent treatment of genealogy in the Thebaid and argues that it is a significant aspect of the characterisation of the seven heroes: Adrastus, Polynices, Tydeus, Amphiaraus, Parthenopoeus, Hippomedon and Capaneus.
This paper examines the lineages of the seven heroes against Thebes as given in the Thebaid: Adrastus, Polynices, Tydeus, Amphiaraus, Parthenopaeus, Hippomedon and Capaneus.
In the case of Hippomedon and Capaneus, no parentage is given, though Statius vaguely alludes to them having noble families.
After Hippomedon wins the discus, Adrastus then orders the victory prize to go to him.
64) Statius suggests some relation to Atreus, as Tydeus appeals to Hippomedon to bring the head of Melanippus to him if there is 'any blood of Atreus in him,' (65) but it is never explicitly clarified what their kinship is.