Spanish America

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Spanish America

the parts of America colonized by Spaniards from the 16th century onwards and now chiefly Spanish-speaking: includes all of South America (except Brazil, Guyana, French Guiana, and Surinam), Central America (except Belize), Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and a number of small Caribbean islands
References in periodicals archive ?
(UCI) is the media company serving Hispanic America. The company, a chief content creator in the US, includes Univision Network, one of the top networks in the US regardless of language and the most-watched Spanish-language broadcast television network in the country, available in approximately 90% of US Hispanic television households.
"Hispanic America", por seu turno, seria inapelavelmente "cientifico", "claro", "verdadeiro" e "justo".
For this reason, it is a pleasure for us to present this research papers to show the progress of researchers in Hispanic America.
Fusion is betting the two aren't mutually exclusive--that it can direct content to Hispanic America and be part of the mainstream conversation as well.
Loteria is a game played in slightly different variations in most countries of Hispanic America. I remember playing it in Cuba during my childhood.
"Univision has the attention of Hispanic America and a crossover audience of Hispanic food lovers, so this assortment is a natural fit for their viewers and the market at large," DeVito said.
Hispanic America's purchasing power now weighs in at $1.2 trillion, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth.
Bolivar played a key role in Hispanic America's successful struggle for independence from the Spanish Empire, and is today considered one of the most influential politicians in the history of the Americas.
This section opens with Simon Bolivar's declaration of Hispanic America as a mestizo land in 1819, and closes with comments by Mario Vargas Llosa in 2006.
It all goes back to our mantra of becoming the heartbeat of the Hispanic audience, of Hispanic America, which is even more exciting, because the Latino audience is having such an impact."
Thus, in Puerto Rico, as in the rest of Hispanic America, the imposition of the Spanish language and conversion to Catholicism during colonial times did not undermine the racism that was later, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, rearticulated through nationalist discourses or scientific theories of race.

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