Hispaniola

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Hispaniola

(hĭs'pănyō`lə), Span. Española (ĕspänyō`lä), second largest island of the West Indies, 29,530 sq mi (76,483 sq km), between Cuba and Puerto Rico. HaitiHaiti
, Fr. Haïti , officially Republic of Haiti, republic (2015 est. pop. 10,711,000), 10,700 sq mi (27,713 sq km), West Indies, on the western third of the island of Hispaniola.
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 occupies the western third of the island and the Dominican RepublicDominican Republic
, republic (2015 est. pop. 10,528,000), 18,700 sq mi (48,442 sq km), West Indies, on the eastern two thirds of the island of Hispaniola. The capital and largest city is Santo Domingo.
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 the remainder. Visited by Columbus in 1492, the island was called Española. The later French colony was called Saint-Domingue, after Santo Domingo, the Spanish colony in the eastern part of the island. The terrain, dominated by the Cordillera Central, is high and rugged; Pico Duarte (10,417 ft/3,175 m high) is the tallest peak. Extending far westward, like the claws of a crab, two mountain ranges form the scenic Gulf of Gonâve. The island's climate is subtropical, and agriculture (coffee, cocoa, sugarcane, and tobacco) flourishes in the abundant rainfall. In some areas of the island (in Haiti especially), increased population has caused significant deforestation for cultivation. Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic, are the largest cities.
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Hispaniola

the second largest island in the Caribbean, in the Greater Antilles: divided politically into Haiti and the Dominican Republic; discovered in 1492 by Christopher Columbus, who named it La Isla Española. Area: 18 703 sq. km (29 418 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The richness of the pearl grounds in the Margarita Island-Cubagua Island--Coche Island area can also be seen from the following records of Royal Treasury officials on Hispanola; the Royal Treasury kept 20% of the pearls harvested in Venezuelan waters.
Ironically, his next overseas posting after Upper Canada was to the French part of Hispanola (Haiti), where he was to put down a slave uprising.
Stephanie Jed, for example, casts her discerning eye on the diplomatic prose of Milan, the economic and cultural transactions between Hispanola and Venice, and the marginalia of an Este military servant to show that the chivalric romance held not only a power over the imagination of kings and soldiers, but also formed a "system of particular social relations ...
Columbus arrived on the Santa Maria on the north coast of the island of Hispanola (now shared by the Dominican Republic and Haiti) in 1492.
During 1494-96, when Columbus administered Hispanola (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic), 100,000 of the 300,000 indigenous people died.
600 on Great Inagua, at the extreme southern end of the archipelago, with migrants coming from Hispanola. (No mention is made of an aceramic people already being present, although possible aceramic sites have been found in the central and northern islands.) Except for the date, the last two conclusions are not held by all anthropologists working in the Bahamas.
Hence from the islands of Hispanola and Cuba, to Florida and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, from Texas to Veracruz, Mexico a "technical-racial diffusion took place in the 18th and 19th centuries." (3)
teneriffana records for 43 geographic areas (countries, island groups, major islands, and US states; Tables 1-3) including 11 West Indian islands for which I found no previously published records: Antigua, Barbados, Barbuda, Curagao, Dominica, Dominican Republic (Hispanola), Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, and St Lucia.
The struggles intensified when in the late 17th century the French took the western part of the island from the Spaniards who had colonised it first under the name Hispanola and later San Domingo.