Historical archeology

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Historical archeology

The study of the cultural remains of literate societies, as distinct from prehistoric archeology. American historical archeology deals with excavated material as well as above-ground resources, such as buildings, pottery, weapons, tools, glassware, cutlery and textiles.
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in History and Historical Archaeology from the University of Massachusetts Boston, and a J.
Historical archaeology has a long tradition in Cuba; see, for just one example, Lourdes Dominguez, Arqueologia Colonial Cubana: Dos Estudios (1984).
For instance, students and researchers can use the historical archaeology ceramics database to search for examples of stoneware recovered from archaeological sites.
Their topics include the archaeology of San Francisco's gold rush waterfront in 1849-51: building a new model of the 19th-century Pacific Rim maritime frontier, approaching transient labor through archaeology, trying to separate the Indian from the American in the historical archaeology of the American Indian, the archaeology of the Chinese and Japanese diasporas in North America and a framework for comparing the material lives of transnational migrant communities, dangerous discipline: doing historical archaeology in Utah, and mild wild west: settling communities and settling households in turn-of-the-century Idaho.
Enhanced with illustrations consisting of figures and tables, an informative introduction (Arkansas Historical Archaeology through Time), and a five page Index, "Historical Archaeology of Arkansas" is very highly recommended for community and academic library collections.
Between Artifacts and Texts: Historical Archaeology in Global Perspective.
Custer, Cody, and Grand Duke Alexis: Historical Archaeology of the Royal Buffalo Hunt.
At the Fourth National Congress on Argentine Historical Archaeology in 2009 a symposium was organized to discuss the archaeology of the African diaspora.
Describing their work as a kind of historical archaeology, the authors identify the elements they see as key to the success of a cenacle: how long it is in existence, how often it is frequented (and by how many people), and how well-known it becomes in the general cultural atmosphere of the day.
Stephen Driscoll, Professor of historical archaeology at Glasgow University, said: "The Govan Stones gives us clues towards the complex and evolving society that existed.

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