Harlequin Duck

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Harlequin Duck

 

(Histrionicus histrionicus), a bird of the family Anatidae. Length, approximately 45 cm; weight, 500– g. The bill is short, the tail is pointed and gradated, and there is a large paddle on the hind digit. The plumage is slate black, with a brightly colored head. The harlequin duck is found in the mountains of Asia (Eastern Siberia) and North America (northwest), as well as along the Atlantic coast of North America and the Greenland and Iceland coasts. It nests near mountain rivers, and winters near rocky sea coasts. The clutch contains four to eight eggs. The harlequin duck feeds on crustaceans, mollusks, and aquatic insects. It is of little commercial significance.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Species Number Percent Surf Scoter 18 24.7 (Melanitta perspicillata) Long-tailed Duck 14 19.2 (Clangula hyemalis) White-winged Scoter 13 17.8 (Melanitta fusca) Greater Scaup 13 17.8 (Aythya marila) Black Scoter 8 10.1 (Melanitta nigra) Lesser Scaup 2 2.7 (Aythya affinis) Hooded Merganser 2 2.7 (Lophodytes cucullatus) Bufflehead 1 1.4 (Bucephala albeola) Harlequin Duck 1 1.4 (Histrionicus histrionicus) Mallard 1 1.4 (Anas platyrhynchos) Total 73 100.0 TABLE 2.
Helminths of two anuran species; Atelopus spurrelli (Bufonidae) and Dendrobates histrionicus (Dendrobatidae), from Colombia, South America.
Such injured biological resources included bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), black oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani), common loons (Gavia immer), clams, common murres (Uria aalge), cormorants (Phalacrocorax, three species), cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii), Dolly Varden trout (Salvelinus malma), harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus), harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), Kittlitz's murrelets (Brachyramphus brevirostris), marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus marmoratus), killer whales (Orcinus orca), mussels (Mytilus edulis), Pacific herring (Clupea harengus), river otters (Lutra canadensis), pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), rockfish (Sebastes sp.), sea otters (Enhydra lutris), and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka).
The areas surrounding these islands are essential winter habitat for a number of sea duck species such as Common Eider (Somateria mollissima), King Eider (Somateria spectabilis), Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus), Long-tailed Duck (Claugula hyemalis), White-winged Scoter (Melanitta deglandi), and Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus senator; Sowls 1993, 1997).
2001); White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons', Fields and Scribner, 1997); Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos; Maak et al.,, 2003); Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus; Buchholz et al.,, 1998); Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri; S.
Breeding ecology of the Harlequin Duck (Histrionicus histrionicus L.) in Iceland.
Consumption of an aquatic bird (Harlequin Duck, Histrionicus histrionicus) was also visually observed by Tallman and others (2004) in the San Juan Islands.
Surgical and immediate post-release mortality of Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) implanted with abdominal radio transmitters with percutaneous antennae.
Harlequin duck Histrionicus histrionicus population structure in eastern Nearctic.
For ducks, reported predation by marine mammals includes killer whales (Orcinas orca) eating common eiders (Somateria mollissima) and flightless steamer-ducks (Tach-yeres leucocephalus) (Straneck et al., 1983; Smith, 2006), sea otters (Enhydra lutris) preying on adult surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata) (Reidman and Estes, 1988), and a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) attacking a harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) (Tallman and Sullivan, 2004).
If we apply to eiders the maximum sustainable harvest level of 3-5% predicted for another long-lived sea duck, the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) (Goudie et al., 1994), Holman's hunt was within sustainable limits for common eiders ([less than]1% harvest of population), but perhaps not for king eiders (3.7-6.9% harvest, including crippling losses).