Hivites


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Hivites

(hī`vīts), in the Bible, peaceful tribe probably living in the vicinity of Jerusalem. They were crushed in the Hebrew occupation.
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References in classic literature ?
They were too ignorant to realize, when they were called upon, that Rebecca's absence would make everything come wrong, and the blow descended with crushing force when the Jebusites and Amorites, the Girgashites, Hivites, and Perizzites had to be pronounced by the persons of all others least capable of grappling with them.
Yes, those live-and-let-live words are in Deuteronomy, but so, too, is this divine injunction not cited by Hazony: "Cast out many nations before thee, the Hittites, and the Girgashites, and the Amorites, and the Canaanites, and the Perizzites, and the Hivites, and the Jebusites." The Israelites are ordered to "smite them, and utterly destroy them; thou shalt make no covenant with them, nor shew mercy unto them."
Thus, Canaanite refers to the Phoenicians, Philistines, Ammonites, Hittites, Jobusites, Amorites, and Hivites.
So, I went down to release them from the hands of the Egyptians and to bring them to a good and broad land, a land flowing with milk and honey, the place of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites.
Judah Low ben Bezalel (1520-1609), the celebrated Maharal of Prague, offers a similar explanation but maintains that because of their link with the serpent, the Hivites were regarded as the most cursed of nations while the serpent was regarded as the most cursed of beasts (Gen.
At Genesis 15:19, the Bible says Canaan, who was cursed by his grandfather Noah, "was the father of Sidon his firstborn, and the Hittites, Jebusites, Amorites, Girgashites, Hivites, Arkites, Sinites, Arvadites, Zemarites, and Hathites.
The articles by Gass deal with critical and historical questions concerning peoples who appear in Judges: Amalekites, Kenites, the locale Maon and the Meuintes, Midianites, and the standard Deuteronomistic catalog of seven peoples, with special attention given to Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites.
Firstly, out of all the tribes that used to live in the land (Moabites, Ammonites, Hivites, etc.) just one is left.
In the Old Testament, Deuteronomy has often proclaimed violence: "But thou shalt utterly destroy them the Hittites, Amorites, Canaanites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites as the LORD your God has commanded you" (20:17).
(139) For the moral particularist, the moral relevance of any feature depends on the context of the one case, features thereby have variable relevance, and "a feature that is a reason in one case may be no reason at all, or an opposite reason, in another." (140) By this view, moral considerations are decided "on a case by case basis." (141) Biblically, it is a moral duty to fight against that regime (Hittites, Amorites, Canaanites, Perizzites, Hivites, Jebusites, et al.).
When the Lord spoke to Moses and told him that he would deliver the Jews from Egypt he also said he would bring them into oa good land and a large, unto a land flowing with milk and honey; unto the place of the Canaanites, and the Hittites, and the Amorites, and the Perizzites, and the Hivites, and the Jebusites.o
Indeed, I know their sufferings, and I have come down to deliver them from the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land to a good and broad land, a land flowing with milk and honey, to the country of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites." (Exod 3:6-8) What can be read in the book of Esther as divine preservation from the threat of genocide is bound not to abstract ideas of providence but to God's election of Israel.