Hizen

Hizen

 

a principality in feudal Japan, in the western part of the island of Kyushu. Hizen belonged to a coalition of southwestern principalities, consisting of Satsuma, Choshu, Tosa, and Hizen, which opposed the Tokugawa government during the incomplete bourgeois revolution of 1867–68, also known as the Meiji Restoration. In 1871 the principality was made part of the prefecture of Nagasaki.

References in periodicals archive ?
The 1630 invasion scheme was associated almost completely with a single enthusiast: Matsukura Bungo-no-kami Shigemasa (1574-1630), the daimyo (great lord) and notorious tyrant of Shimabara in Hizen Province, whose cruel treatment of the people and persecution of Christians is very well recorded.
A Japanese envoy from Hizen had requested a copy of a work identified only as Yomsong [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
With its roots in the Far East, original Imari ware was made in the town of Arita in the Hizen Province of Japan.
In addition to Ito and Inoue, other Sat-Cho leaders, such as Yamagata Aritomo [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1838-1922) from Choshu, Terashima Munenori [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1832-93) from Satsuma, Soejima Taneomi from Hizen, Goto Shojiro [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1838-97) from Tosa, and the conservative privy councilor Motoda Nagazane [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1818-91), were opposed to the Okuma plan.
21) For example, one tsuchigumo named Omimi in the district of Matsuura of Hizen Province promised to give food to the emperor a tribute (Uegaki 335-336), another tsuchigumo called Utsuhiomaro in Sonoki district of the same province even saved an imperial ship (Uegagi 345).
Friday on the JR Nagasaki Line between Hizen Nagata and Oe stations.
In 1682 (Edo period), the Kuroda clan that governed the area invited potters from the nearby Hizen Imari pottery site to demonstrate their techniques.