ayahuasca

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ayahuasca

or

yagé,

drink made by boiling various South American plants, used for centuries by shamans of traditional societies in the Amazon region in religious and healing ceremonies. It is usually made with the ayahuasca vine (Banisteriopsis caapi), which contains monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), and the leaves of the chacruna plant (Psychotria viridis) or of the chacropanga plant (Diplopterys cabrerana), both of which contain N,N-dimethyltriptamine (DMT), in addition to other plants. DMT is a psychoactive compound that acts as a hallucinogenic drughallucinogenic drug
, any of a group of substances that alter consciousness; also called psychotomimetic (i.e., mimicking psychosis), mind-expanding, or psychedelic drug.
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 when MAOIs prevent the body from breaking it down. The drink also is a powerful emetic. In more recent years, ayahuasca has been used by many Westerners seeking altered states of consciousness, often as a means of personal growth, and has been investigated by scientific researchers for possible psychotherapeutic and other medicinal uses.
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application of the Controlled Substances Act with regard to hoasca);
418,433 (2006) (comparing a requested exemption for religious use of hoasca to a regulatory exemption for religious use of peyote); Hobby Lobby, 134 S.
O Centro Espirita Beneficente Uniao do Vegetal, the Supreme Court applied the RFRA to the case of a religious sect that sought an exemption from the Controlled Substances Act in order to use a hallucinogenic tea (hoasca) in its rituals.
Fast and slow metabolizers of Hoasca. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 37 (2): 157-61.
On "human pharmacology of hoasca": A medical anthropology perspective.
(224) Using the example of the hoasca tea used by the Christian Spiritist sect that found protection in O'Centro, the Amici argued that seizure of such a substance by customs agents would not involve a threat of penalty, thus passing muster under the Ninth Circuit's standard.
418, 439 (2006) (holding that the government failed to carry its burden in showing a compelling interest to bar the use of hoasca tea, which contains a schedule I substance, in religious ceremonies), with Gonzales v.
O Centro Espirita Beneficente Uniao Do Vegetal, (64) the Court affirmed a preliminary injunction preventing the government from using the Controlled Substances Act from prosecuting practitioners of a Amazon Rainforest religious sect that receives communion by drinking a tea that contains hoasca, a hallucinogen that is prohibited under the federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA).
The Court ruled that the federal government's interest in fighting the war on drugs and its desire to follow a fair uniform standard would not justify its refusal to accommodate the need of the religious claimants to ingest hoasca, a mildly hallucinogenic and.
Working in the Amazon, Gabriel encountered natives who introduced him to the mysteries of ayahuasca (also called hoasca and yage), a tea typically made with Psychotria viridis leaves, which contain DMT, and the Banisteriopsis caapi vine, which contains chemicals that make the DMT orally active by preventing enzymes from breaking it down before it can reach the bloodstream.
And she condemns the courts for interpreting RFRA to create an exception for religious use of hoasca, (14) a drug that is similar to peyote in its chemistry and religious use, "without hearings or studies" (p.