e-mail spoofing

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e-mail spoofing

The unauthorized use of a third-party domain name as the sender's name in an e-mail message. Most often used by spammers, spoofing the name of a popular retailer or organization entices the recipient to read the full message. See e-mail authentication, spoofing and spam.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Riyadh, March 15 -- It is learnt that a hoax e-mail telling people they may have cancer has been in circulation in many parts of the world.
PEOPLE in Bahrain are being warned against a hoax e-mail purporting to come from UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon, seeking access to their personal information.
"We are investigating who is behind the hoax e-mail," said Shell spokesman Rainer Winzenried.
Meanwhile, one person who will not be taking the club over is Rick Parkinson, who appears to have been behind a hoax e-mail from a public relations company claiming he wanted to buy the club with a group of North East businessmen.
In the case of the current phishing scam, the hoax e-mail appears to the recipient to be coming from an employee of the organisation (bank) and coerces the recipient into clicking on a website link.
Activists are believed to be behind a hoax e-mail flooding Tyneside, saying Nexus is letting everyone off with fares in a one-off freebie.
Major online threats include phishing -when a hoax e-mail asks the recipient to update their account details.
LIBERAL Democrats in Soli-hull have been left red-faced after being taken in by a hoax e-mail inviting MP Lorely Burt to join the Tories.
THE Bank of England was the victim of a hoax e-mail yesterday that asked business and the public to download software to protect their cash accounts.
The Bank of England fell victim to a hoax e-mail yesterdaythat asked business and the public to download software to protect their cash accounts.
Most hoax e-mail originates from pranks and attempts at humor, such as the announcement asking administrators to shut down school servers for a 24-hour period so the Internet could be "cleaned."
The hoax e-mail claims that British Airways and Microsoft were tracking the e-mail, and for every five people that recipients forward it to, they would receive a free return flight to London from any destination in the world or a flight to any Asian destination from London.