Hofmannsthal


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Related to Hofmannsthal: Hugo von Hofmannsthal

Hofmannsthal

Hugo von . 1874--1929, Austrian lyric poet and dramatist, noted as the librettist for Richard Strauss' operas, esp Der Rosenkavalier (1911), Elektra (1909), and Ariadne auf Naxos (1912)
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Earlier scholarship on Der Rosenkavalier identifies literary sources, such as Pierre Beaumarchais' Figaro trilogy, as influential, and traces connections between Der Rosenkavalier and the operatic models that Strauss and Hofmannsthal discussed in their letters.
Die Charakteristiken Herders, Goethes, Gunderrodes, Hofmannsthals und Brechts, ihrer Stellung im literarischen Feld ihrer Zeit sowie ihrer jeweiligen 'Gattungsarbeit' sind dagegen Hohepunkte des Buches.
Hofmannsthal and Strauss's adaptation of the story focuses tightly on Elektra, single-mindedly expressing her emotions and psychology as she meets with other characters, mostly one at a time.
This is precisely the allegorical situation that Coetzee and Hofmannsthal are describing.
Schnitzler, Musil, Hofmannsthal, among others); the graphic arts (Klimt, Loos); film; and the popular media.
In the first act of the opera Der Rosenkavalier, Hugo von Hofmannsthal lets the middleaged Princess--die Marschallin--contemplate the passing of time.
When Hofmannsthal sent Strauss the scene in the spring of 1909 the composer was delighted with it and wrote back: 'It will set itself to music like oil and melted butter; I'm hatching it already.
Compared with the seriousness of both Elektra and Ariadne, Rosenkavalier - written by the same librettist, Hugo von Hofmannsthal - is a madly bizarre work.
The editor has chosen 28 tales of the total and, in addition to the Preface includes the sections on 'contexts' - particularly important for this unique work - and 'criticisms' - reaching from Hofmannsthal to David Pinault - which are standard in this much respected Critical Edition series from Norton.
When Hugo von Hofmannsthal was barely eighteen, his Viennese fin-de-siecle contemporaries hailed that his verses contained "such perfection, such faultless plasticity, such musical feeling" that they had not thought "possible since Goethe" This new assemblage of his work, however, showcases what Hofmannsthal wanted most out of writing: Verwandlung, or transformation.
Viennese Jewish Modernism: Freud, Hofmannsthal, Beer-Hofmann, and Schnitzler, by Abigail Gillman.
Based on a philosophical reading of literary texts from Hesiod's minimal "chaos" (261) to Hesse's elaborate "allegory" (265), through engaging discussions about Aeschylus, Derrida, Schmitt, Hofmannsthal, Lukacs, Benjamin, Nietzsche, Canetti, and Weber, the unpolitical involves the overcoming of the political.