Hogarth

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Hogarth

William. 1697--1764, English engraver and painter. He is noted particularly for his series of engravings satirizing the vices and affectations of his age, such as A Rake's Progress (1735) and Marriage à la Mode (1745)
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References in periodicals archive ?
If the footnote on the "great magnet" tends to carry us towards infinity and away from Hogarth's more bounded lines, then the passage to which it refers draws us back towards central Hogarthian principles: intricacy, variety, movement, pursuit, beauty, and life.
Stage excrement is to be made of gingerbread: all very Hogarthian!
Not surprisingly, wherever Beeman turns he finds colonial parvenus trying to act like grown-up English gentlemen, but he also finds Hogarthian discord.
McClure gathered Hogarthian descriptions from A-division's officers, like "(they) pinch our cars and bust our windows and break into our shops.
So hilarious and vivid was Wolfe's caricature of Shawn as a Jamesian hobbit that its Hogarthian exaggerations still persist in the perception of Shawn, his phobias and formalities inseparable from the magazine's institutional lore.
The reasons for this discrepancy go back to Hogarth's greater stress on narrative, expressed, for example, in his use of "progress pieces." His methods suggested to those using the literary medium a dramatic disclosure rather than a frozen tableau, and thus they could more easily incorporate Hogarthian scenes into their own fictions.
(17) The veritably Hogarthian details described by Richard Bancroft were current throughout the tenure of the Children of Paul's.
The incarceration itself is given a luridly Hogarthian rendition, with Mounsey insisting that 'little else is known of conditions at Potter's except from the internal evidence of [...] Jubilate Agno', which he then reads with unguarded literalism.
Some people say Dant's work is Hogarthian or Swiftian in its use of satire.
Con Men and Cutpurses: Scenes from the Hogarthian Underworld.
Even the ameliorative gesture of one particular engineer to introduce "the conscious aesthetic artifice" of Hogarthian curves only produces a model "academically correct in outline," still "inanimate and cold" and ultimately governed by principles of economic utility and progress in an effort to ensure the quickest method of connecting one place to another (186).
The first of them, "A Pickled Nose," describes, with many feisty Gothic details, Hogarthian life in a louche Soho drinking club, The Colony, made famous by the patronage of painter Francis Bacon.