Holgrave

Holgrave

hides his identity as the builder’s descendant and finds the concealed deed to the land. [Am. Lit.: Hawthorne The House of the Seven Gables]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Holgrave," cried she, as soon as she could speak, "I never can go through with it Never, never, never I wish I were dead, and in the old family tomb, with all my forefathers!
Holgrave, that you should have ideas like these," rejoined Hepzibah, drawing up her gaunt figure with slightly offended dignity.
"But I was not born a gentleman; neither have I lived like one," said Holgrave, slightly smiling; "so, my dear madam, you will hardly expect me to sympathize with sensibilities of this kind; though, unless I deceive myself, I have some imperfect comprehension of them.
Holgrave, and will do my utmost to be a good shop-keeper."
"Pray do" said Holgrave, "and let me have the pleasure of being your first customer.
Holgrave took his departure, leaving her, for the moment, with spirits not quite so much depressed.
This paper investigates the three phases of Holgrave's perspective of social reform and examines the inseparable relationship between Hawthorne's reformist impulse and historical consciousness in The House of the Seven Gables, which illustrates the power of social reform for renewal and regeneration and the force of history (as embodied by ancestral sins).
little circle of not unkindly souls" (Hepzibah, Phoebe, Holgrave,
Hawthorne's political solution, not surprisingly, is figured in a marriage between Phoebe Pyncheon, a poor relation of the Salem Pyncheons, and Holgrave, who is secretly a Maule descendant.
Courtmanche moves to The House of the Seven Gables in the next chapter, and notes that the New Adam and Eve figures of America, Holgrave and Phoebe, echo sentiments of Hawthorne's words in The Scarlet Letter to "provide nineteenth-century readers with prototypes of how to live a life characterized by 'sacred love' and a 'relation[ship] between man and woman [based] on a surer ground of mutual happiness'" (91).
In The House of the Seven Gables, Loman points out, Hawthorne "cants away" from attributing to Holgrave a "commitment to Fourierist doctrine"; Venner's rejection of capitalist individualism and egotism similarly lacks "'systematizing' Fourierist 'distinctness'" (26).
In The House of the Seven Gables Hawthorne writes about the ancestor-haunted Pyncheons, also living under a family curse (for cheating a man out of his land): "The wrong-doing of one generation lives into the successive ones, and, divesting itself of every temporary advantage, becomes a pure and uncontrollable mischief." Holgrave, the boarder, a nineteenth-century techie (a daguerreotypist), speaks for the modern world when he cries, "Shall we never, never get rid of this Past?"