Holgrave

Holgrave

hides his identity as the builder’s descendant and finds the concealed deed to the land. [Am. Lit.: Hawthorne The House of the Seven Gables]
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Holgrave," cried she, as soon as she could speak, "I never can go through with it Never, never, never I wish I were dead, and in the old family tomb, with all my forefathers
Holgrave, that you should have ideas like these," rejoined Hepzibah, drawing up her gaunt figure with slightly offended dignity.
But I was not born a gentleman; neither have I lived like one," said Holgrave, slightly smiling; "so, my dear madam, you will hardly expect me to sympathize with sensibilities of this kind; though, unless I deceive myself, I have some imperfect comprehension of them.
Holgrave, and will do my utmost to be a good shop-keeper.
Pray do" said Holgrave, "and let me have the pleasure of being your first customer.
While scholars have worked to unpack the many tensions present in the "cent-shop" opening of the Pyncheon's mansion, Sweeney centers her critical attention on an earlier moment, in which Hepzibah rents a room to Holgrave, establishing the presence of a boardinghouse--what she calls "a more flexible and diverse possibility for 'family'"--in the novel (333).
Holgrave and Phoebe, free of both the oligarchic and democratic versions of the lust for power, are Hawthorne's natural aristocrats.
The House of the Seven Gables reflects not only Hawthorne's attempts to grapple with the implications of modern technologies of representation on a transcendental conception of personal identity, but also, specifically in the love story of Holgrave and Phoebe, his continued effort to (re)conceptualize the meaning of the romance as an artistic and decidedly ethical mode of relation between the self and others.
Courtmanche moves to The House of the Seven Gables in the next chapter, and notes that the New Adam and Eve figures of America, Holgrave and Phoebe, echo sentiments of Hawthorne's words in The Scarlet Letter to "provide nineteenth-century readers with prototypes of how to live a life characterized by 'sacred love' and a 'relation[ship] between man and woman [based] on a surer ground of mutual happiness'" (91).
In The House of the Seven Gables, Loman points out, Hawthorne "cants away" from attributing to Holgrave a "commitment to Fourierist doctrine"; Venner's rejection of capitalist individualism and egotism similarly lacks "'systematizing' Fourierist 'distinctness'" (26).
Holgrave, the boarder, a nineteenth-century techie (a daguerreotypist), speaks for the modern world when he cries, "Shall we never, never get rid of this Past?
This dynamic of pastness and modernity also holds for The House of the Seven Gables, most of all through the daguerreotypist, Holgrave, whose defeat of the Pyncheons and love for Phoebe ambiguously conservativize his previous will to change and revolution.