Holofernes

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Holofernes

(hŏl'əfûr`nēz, hōlə–), in the Bible, invading general killed by Judith to save her city, Bethulia.
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Holofernes

Assyrian commander-in-chief beheaded by Judith. [Apocrypha: Judith 13:4–10]

Holofernes

shameless pedagogue-schoolmaster. [Br. Lit.: Love’s Labour’s Lost]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Holofernes

the Assyrian general, who was killed by the biblical heroine Judith
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The paintingis the second by Caravaggio to depict the decapitation of the drunken Holofernes by Judith.
Before the Toulouse discovery, only a meticulous copy of "Judith and Holofernes," painted by Louis Finson, indicated the existence of the original.
After worshipping God and asking him to stand by her, she left the city and went out to meet Holofernes.
The anomaly in the first section was the Judith with the Head of Holofernes, here dated c.
Asi, en los dos primeros cuartetos se inspiraria en las representaciones pictoricas que recogen la escena justo despues de la decapitacion de Holofernes por parte de Judith, particularmente en la magistral version de Tintoretto, mientras que en el ultimo terceto planteamos que el Fenix podria estar realizando una ecfrasis de la escena en la que la heroina hebrea exhibe de manera triunfal la cabeza del general asirio desde lo alto de los muros de Betulia.
Pollock argued that Gentileschi's legendary painting of decapitation, Judith Slaying Holofernes, ca.
She argues that in Le Mystere de Judith et Holofernes, probably authored by Jean de Molinet around the turn of the sixteenth century, Judith's actions are presented as a performance, enacted on the stage of the enemy camp, in which she is an agent of God.
Over time, the widow charmed one Assyrian general, the powerful Holofernes. After seven nights of her temptation, she finally offered herself to this man, but in anticipation of the night to follow, he drank an excess of wine.
In times of the kings of Israel when the nation was in some danger, they fasted and wore sack clothes and poured ashes on their heads and bodies to ask the Father in heaven for assistance, as when Nabuchudonosor through his general Holofernes threatened to demolish the Israelites.
There is some lovely wordplay by the flamboyant Spaniard Don Armado (John Hodgkinson) with his mispronounced English, doddery schoolmaster Holofernes (David Horovitch), who has the funniest laugh, and comic Costard (Nick Haverson).