HomeRF


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

HomeRF

(HOME Radio Frequency) A wireless technology from the HomeRF Working Group, Portland, OR, founded in 1998 by Compaq, IBM, HP and others. In early 2003, the Group disbanded due to lack of interest in competing against the Wi-Fi standard. The HomeRF open standard used the Shared Wireless Access Protocol (SWAP) to transmit in the unlicensed 2.4 GHz band between mobile and desktop devices within a range of 150 feet at 1 or 2 Mbps. Up to 127 devices could be addressed. Derived from the Digital European Cordless Telephone (DECT) standard, HomeRF used a frequency hopping technique that changed 50 times per second. Each 20 ms frame contained one CSMA/CA slot for data and six full-duplex TDMA slots for voice. See wireless LAN and Wi-Fi.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
HomeRF 2.0 operates at up to 10Mb/s and supports the integration of voice, data and streaming media capabilities across a range of devices including PCs, web tablets, PDAs, cordless phones, wireless speakers, music devices and television devices.
HomeRF -- An emerging standard driven by the independent HomeRF Working Group, for using the 2.4 gigabit radio band to create wireless net-work devices targeted for home use, rather than businesses.
Technology companies on both sides of the issue had been lobbying furiously in recent months, with HomeRF Working Group supporters (led by Intel, Motorola, and Proxim) squaring off against members of the Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance (including Lucent and Apple) who support the 802.11B specification.
(42.) Proxim and Next Level Communications to Deliver High-speed Wireless Services to Consumers Via HomeRF Industry Standard, CAMBRIDGE TELECOM REP., Dec.
Digianswer will provide Motorola with its Bluetooth wireless technology and co-develop a HomeRF offering with Motorola.
* HomeRF shipments comprised approximately 45 percent of total wireless Local Area Network (LAN) node shipments to the home in 2000, but for 2001, HomeRF will only command approximately 30 percent of the total residential WLAN market.
Recently, two new wireless technologies have emerged to compete with 802.11b--Bluetooth and HomeRF. These new technologies increase the choices, and possibly the complexity, for enterprises faced with choosing a wireless product.
The two US companies have worked together for three years to develop products based on Proxim's HomeRF wireless technology.