Homestead Act of 1862


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Homestead Act of 1862

U.S. federal legislation permitting settlers to occupy a homestead on designated public land in the western states and own it after five years.
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The original Homestead Act of 1862 entitled anyone who was the head of a family or at least twenty-one years of age to meet the requirements and receive a patent to public lands they had successfully homesteaded, without regard to gender or marital status (including lawful divorce).
By virtue of the Homestead Act of 1862, unmarried, widowed, and divorced women were able to claim land as the heads of households, and many became quite successful.
On the very same day, the Homestead Act of 1862 was enacted.
Unit 6--The Legacy" helps students draw conclusions for understanding the Homestead Act of 1862.
Last year, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced plans to open a major water market among users of the Colorado River--a move that some observers have described as the largest deregulation of a national resource since the Homestead Act of 1862.
The railroads gave settlers the means to reach the plains, the Homestead Act of 1862, an incentive.
With the forts in place, settlers were then free to move westward, but with one caveat: They had to follow the scripts set by the Homestead Act of 1862 and all subsequent land settlement statutes.
The Homestead Act of 1862 was a landmark event at a time when the American Nation was being torn apart by the Civil War.