Homestead Act of 1862


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.

Homestead Act of 1862

U.S. federal legislation permitting settlers to occupy a homestead on designated public land in the western states and own it after five years.
References in periodicals archive ?
(58.) "And be it further enacted, That no lands acquired under the provisions of this act shall in any event become liable to the satisfaction of any debt or debts contracted prior to the issuing of the patent therefor." Homestead Act of 1862, ch.
(92.) See supra note 56 and accompanying text (noting that the Act of May 14, 1898 applied the Homestead Act of 1862 to Alaska but limited claims to eighty acres).
(3.) By virtue of the Homestead Act of 1862, unmarried, widowed, and divorced women were able to claim land as the heads of households, and many became quite successful.
"Unit 6--The Legacy" helps students draw conclusions for understanding the Homestead Act of 1862. "Unit 7--Resource Materials and Bibliography" lists possible resources for more knowledge.
Last year, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced plans to open a major water market among users of the Colorado River--a move that some observers have described as the largest deregulation of a national resource since the Homestead Act of 1862. The rule will allow interstate sales among the southern users of the Colorado River--Arizona, Nevada and California.
The railroads gave settlers the means to reach the plains, the Homestead Act of 1862, an incentive.
With the forts in place, settlers were then free to move westward, but with one caveat: They had to follow the scripts set by the Homestead Act of 1862 and all subsequent land settlement statutes.
The Homestead Act of 1862 is as good a place as any to begin our story.
Over the decades under the Homestead Act of 1862, westward expansion had resulted in a whopping 1.6 million claims on government land.
Its mission was to provide social and recreational services for people in communities that were part of the vast expansion of settlement that followed the Homestead Act of 1862.
Besides the Homestead Act of 1862, no other self-help social program in American history can claim such success.
Specifically the Homestead Act of 1862. Under it, a person was entitled to up to 160 acres of land as long as they could live on it.