hominid

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hominid

any primate of the family Hominidae, which includes modern man (Homo sapiens) and the extinct precursors of man

hominid

[′häm·ə·nid]
(anthropology)
Any of the bipedal primates of the family Hominidae (modern or extinct); contains the genera Ardipithecus, Australopithecus, and Homo.
References in periodicals archive ?
The oldest known hominid stone artifacts--a set of pounding rocks and sharp-edged stone flakes--date to 3.
However, a closer look at the Bulgarian pre-human hominid molar revealed that the ape had eaten hard, abrasive objects such as grasses, seeds and nuts.
We cannot observe those moments in prehistory when a hominid uttered its first meaning-filled phrase or track generations of social changes accompanying reliance on cooked food.
The fossil material -- a nearly complete cranium, two lower jaw fragments and three isolated teeth -- was recovered between last July and February, and constitutes a new genus and species of hominid, the articles said.
He said: 'The new hominid displays a unique combination of primitive and derived characters, suggesting a close relationship to the last common ancestor between humans and chimpanzees, suggesting him as a likely ancestor of all later hominids.
The creation of this -- the Great African Riff Valley -- provoked two major events, both of which are thought to have played a key role in the transition of apes to early hominids.
Perhaps of greatest potential importance, paleontologists said, is that the new Sterkfontein skeleton should yield insights into a time of transition in hominid locomotion.
What we call natural selection would thus drive the pre-hominids toward bipedality and a true hominid character.
That hominid could be Homo erectus or the extinct hominids found in Indonesia known as hobbits (SN: 4/30/16, p.
These findings suggest that early hominids evolved dexterous fingers when they were still quadrupeds.
He said: "He is a likely ancestor of all later hominids.