hominoid

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hominoid

of, relating to, or belonging to the primate superfamily Hominoidea, which includes the anthropoid apes and man

hominoid

[′häm·ə‚nȯi̇d]
(anthropology)
A member of the biological superfamily Hominoidea, including humans, the apes (great and lesser apes), and a number of their extinct ancestors and relatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Iberian Peninsula, simians (anthropoids) are not recorded until well within the Miocene (late Aragonian), being represented by pliopithecoids (a Eurasian clade of stem catarrhines) as well as hominoids (apes and humans), whereas cercopithecoids (Old World monkeys) are recorded from the latest Miocene onwards.
This picture suggests the action of several, coordinated "forces" acting on the shape of a paradigmatic hominoid skull.
Political behavior has been a reality since Homo sapiens began some 50 thousand years ago and, to some extent, even before then in the social life of our hominid and, earlier, hominoid forebears.
For BR, the evolution of cultural transmission occurred in a hominoid lineage.
A Novel Testis-binding Protein Gene Arose by Exon Shuffling in Hominoids," Genome 17 (2007): 1129-38; F.
Nasal bone outlines sometimes displayconfusing similarities across different hominoid groups, adds Eckhardt.
The new material also supports arguments for the spread of hominoids from Africa to Asia early in the Miocene period, say the investigators, both of the National Museums of Kenya in Nairobi.
How often, when and why hominoids went "out of Africa" is still a hotly debated field of intense research.
They may belong to another class of hominoids -- ancestors of apes and humans -- known as Kenyapithecus, he reports in the same NATURE.
Schwartz and Grehan pooled humans, orangutans, and the fossil apes into a new group called "dental hominoids," named for their similarly thick-enameled teeth.
More ancient beginnings and transitions, from Hominoids to modern humans, are illuminated in a book written by China's top archaeologists, titled Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology in the People's Republic of China (Academic Press, Inc.
Until now, scientists merely suspected that a group of primitive hominoids known as kenyapithecines (recorded from the Middle Miocene of Africa and Eurasia) might be the ancestral group that hominids would have derived from.