homochiral

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homochiral

[‚hō·mə′kī·rəl]
(organic chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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(3) The first two natural polymers have a one-handed helical structure due to the homochirality of amino acids and sugar units, respectively, while the totally synthetic polymer, isotactic polypropylene, consists of equal amounts of right- and left-handed helices and optically inactive.
Therefore, biomolecular homochirality indicates an organic group of molecules that are characterized by the same handedness.
The process that produced the handedness in the meteorites may provide clues to how homochirality developed in life forms on Earth.
Terrestrial living material displays homochirality and consists almost exclusively of one enantiomer, L-amino acid, one of a pair of amino acids.
Whatever its origin, most scientists agree that homochirality must have begun with a tiny excess of one handedness in the chemistry of the primordial broth.
CHANCE AND NECESSITY There is some reason to believe that nature favors homochirality: It takes extra metabolic energy to keep molecules of different handednesses separate, says Jack Szostak, a biochemist at Harvard University.
That could have got biochemistry started on the road to homochirality, Deamer explains.
Among the topics are free energies of staging a scenario and perpetual motion machines of the third kind, finite-time thermodynamic tools to analyze dissipative processes, concepts and some numerical examples of the emergence of simple structures in complex phenomena, laser energy deposition in nanodroplets and nuclear fusion driven by Coulomb explosion, and biomolecular homochirality as a quasi-fossil of the evolution of life.