Homogamy


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homogamy

[hə′mäg·ə·mē]
(biology)
Inbreeding due to isolation.
(botany)
Condition of having all flowers alike.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Homogamy

 

(1) The simultaneous maturation of the stigma and anthers in a bisexual flower, which makes self-fertilization possible.

(2) An antiquated genetic term (suggested by the English biologist K. Pearson in 1903) indicating selection of similar pairs for crossing.

(3) Transmission by male and female individuals of the same combinations of genes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Religiosity, homogamy, and marital adjustment: An examination of newlyweds in first marriages and remarriages.
As indicated, marital homogamy might pose one obstacle to the formation of black heterosexual unions.
On the other hand, the frequency of homogamy directly determines the extent of acculturation/retention of an ethnic minority as the families in which parents share the same cultural traits (homogamous families) exhibit more retentionist attitude towards their shared traits than the families with mixed cultural parents (heterogamous families).
This study aims to investigate matrimonial strategy among Chaouis by exploring different types of assortative mating: consanguinity, endogamy and social homogamy (cultural and professional) in order to establish the Chaouis family structure.
That is, just as spouses have increasingly similar incomes (marital homogamy is rising), so too neighborhoods are becoming increasingly homogeneous by income (residential segregation is rising).
He argues that the key mechanism has been sorting and then matching through marriage in college--what he calls "cognitive homogamy": breeding by cognitive ability.
And they were more likely to marry people of the same high IQ level and educational background: a practice Murray calls "homogamy."
On the other hand, the Social Homogamy hypothesis is proposed.