Homophones


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Homophones: Homographs

Homophones

 

words pronounced alike but differing in the way they are written (Russian plod, “fruit,” and plot, “raft”; porog, “threshold,” and porok, “vice”; stolb, “post,” and stolp, “pillar”).

Homophones may arise, in particular, as a result of the ability of different phonemes to coincide in pronunciation in one variant. For example, the identical pronunciation of the Russian words dog (“mastiff”) and dok (“dock”), gruzd’ (“peppery lactarius” [a kind of mushroom]) and grust’ (“sadness”), and prud (“pond”) and prut (“twig”) is the result of a specific characteristic of the Russian language: the devoicing of voiced consonants at the end of words and before a voiceless consonant. In other languages, such as French, English, and Chinese, homophones also arise from the similarity in pronunciation of words of different origin that have retained their traditional spelling.

References in periodicals archive ?
Their pattern of performance was characterized by regularization errors at the suprasegmental level and difficulties in tasks requiring the comprehension of homophones and the discrimination between words and pseudohomophones.
Dodgy Dodgy homophones homophones aside, aside, though, though, this this series series following wing high-end high-end pa pawnbrok wnbroker er James James Constantinou nstantinou is is proving proving endles endlessly sly entertaining.
"They may use a homophone, such as gr8 for great, or an initial, like, LOL for laugh out loud," Cingel said.
The error may be contextual and even professional proofreaders sometimes overlook homophones or look-alike words.
Phonemic mergers have resulted in homophones such as meat and meet, or write and right.
The percentage of homophones is somewhat reduced, while the percentage of hesitations increases.
Even though some of them can spell relatively well, the homophones will catch them out.
* accuracy by understanding words in context and retrieval of information according to its meaning, thereby distinguishing homophones;
Homophones are pairs of words which sound alike but have different spellings and different meanings.
"It's not fair, you should have spelled it out - 'rap' and 'wrap' are homophones!"
They noted confusing topic-related terms that were homophones, words with multiple meanings, or words that sounded very similar to other common words, thus identifying possible wordings for puns.
Rhodes took the linguistic slippage between the homophones dual and duel as a point of departure for a highly ambitious, slyly humorous, and slightly maddening installation that managed to weave together personal, historical, and formal concerns.