honeypot

(redirected from Honeynet)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Honeynet: blogging

honeypot

A server that is configured to detect an intruder by mirroring a real production system. It appears as an ordinary server doing work, but all the data and transactions are phony. Located either in or outside the firewall, the honeypot is used to learn about an intruder's techniques as well as determine vulnerabilities in the real system.

Honeynets
A "honeynet" is a network containing honeypots. A "virtual honeynet" is one that resides in a single server, but pretends to be a full network. See firewall, darknet, honeyproxy and honeymonkey.
References in periodicals archive ?
Founded in 1999, The Honeynet Project is a non-profit international research organization dedicated to improving the security of the Internet at no cost to the public.
Correctly done, with the proper controls put into place, a home grown honeypot or honeynet can create your best data and can also be an important resource in defending your domain.
A honeynet may also provide an excellent way to figure out an intruder's intention, by looking at what kind of machines and services are attacked, and what is done to them.
Honeynet, which has taken over the Ghost project, collects and analyzes malware using open source tools.
Qualys will be demonstrating the Nemean Networks technology, including the Honeynet system, at the 8th annual Qualys Security Conference in San Francisco on Oct.
The Honeynet Project consists of a network of "honeypots" (servers set up to trick intruders into believing they've cracked a real computer on the Internet, while administrators watch the attacks happen).
The Honeynet Project is an international, non-profit (501c3) research organization dedicated to improving the security of the Internet at no cost to the public.
and The Honeynet Project in Norway have turned to a free download of QlikView Personal Edition to easily build custom business intelligence applications in order to gain the answers they need.
Dvorak, industry analyst Steve Hunt, Lance Spitzner from the Honeynet Project, Doug Steelman from the Department of Defense, and Vincent Weafer from Symantec.
She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Honeynet Project, which collects data on computer intrusions for the purposes of developing defensive tools and practices.
Unlike previous generations of worms and viruses unleashed by hackers seeking fame or notoriety, botnets used for profit motives are highly stealthy and designed to evade detection by traditional security approaches, such as anti-virus, firewall, anomaly detection and honeynet technology.