Hong Xiu Quan

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Hong Xiu Quan

, Hung Hsiu-Ch'uan
1814--64, Chinese religious leader and revolutionary. Claiming (1851) to be Christ's brother, he led the Taiping rebellion; committed suicide when it was defeated
References in periodicals archive ?
28 There is the example of Hong Kuiyang, a relative of the leader of the Taiping Rebellion, Hong Xiuquan, and an official in the Taiping capital of Nanjing.
By participating in the games as if they were living in the past, students find it easier to understand the complexities that Hong Xiuquan, the Boxer soldiers, and the local Chinese Christians encountered in times of crises.
23) A label tells us that the man in the painting is of course Hong Xiuquan, who in his painting stands before an altar table and smashes the spirit tablet of Confucius by throwing a heavy bronze vessel on it.
Although the Anglo-American Protestant missionaries stressed individual salvation from sin, Hong Xiuquan was concerned with the national salvation of China.
Hong Xiuquan was already dead, having died of natural causes only weeks before.
Hong Xiuquan committed suicide after Qing armies had decimated his followers.
The original vision of Hong Xiuquan and these shorter, but also more frequent and more concrete mediumistic communications formed the basis for all crucial decisions.
Seven years later in 1843, Hong Xiuquan decoded his early dream vision with the Bible and declared himself the younger brother of Jesus, the second son of God.
Minutiae and epic scope are brilliantly blended in this tragic portrait of Hong Xiuquan (1814-64), the religious visionary whose popular rebellion almost toppled the Qing dynasty in the mid-19th century.
When the Quing government sent forces to quell the efforts of Hong Xiuquan who had declared himself the heavenly King of the Taiping Tiango, they met with defeat.
When it became known, however, that Hong Xiuquan believed that his revelation superseded that of the New Testament, many Westerners turned against the Taiping Christians.
There are many Christian historians who will chafe at the thought of this being a "Christian" rebellion, but in Reilly's defense, he shows that the revolutionary leader, Hong Xiuquan, promoted the Bible as the two books that were "pure and without error" (he did not find out until later that the Old and New Testaments were one book in English).