Hopkins


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Related to Hopkins: Gerard Manley Hopkins

Hopkins,

city (1990 pop. 16,534), Hennepin co., SE Minn., a suburb of Minneapolis; inc. as West Minneapolis 1893, name changed 1928. The city manufactures machinery, computer and electronic parts, steel products, air pollution equipment, ophthalmic lenses, tools, jelly and candy, bakery products, and software. An annual raspberry festival is held in Hopkins.

Hopkins

1. Sir Anthony. born 1937, Welsh actor: his films include Bounty (1984), The Silence of the Lambs (1991), Shadowlands (1994), and Hannibal (2000)
2. Sir Frederick Gowland . 1861--1947, British biochemist, who pioneered research into what came to be called vitamins: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1929)
3. Gerald Manley. 1844--89, British poet and Jesuit priest, who experimented with sprung rhythm in his highly original poetry
4. Harry L(loyd). 1890--1946, US administrator. During World War II he was a personal aide to President Roosevelt and administered the lend-lease programme
References in classic literature ?
If you will call a four-wheeler, Hopkins, we shall be ready to start for Forest Row in a quarter of an hour."
Stanley Hopkins led us first to the house, where he introduced us to a haggard, gray-haired woman, the widow of the murdered man, whose gaunt and deep-lined face, with the furtive look of terror in the depths of her red-rimmed eyes, told of the years of hardship and ill-usage which she had endured.
Stanley Hopkins drew the key from his pocket and had stooped to the lock, when he paused with a look of attention and surprise upon his face.
We shall meet you here later, Hopkins, and see if we can come to closer quarters with the gentleman who has paid this visit in the night."
Hopkins was for leaving the door of the hut open, but Holmes was of the opinion that this would rouse the suspicions of the stranger.
"Now, my fine fellow," said Stanley Hopkins, "who are you, and what do you want here?"
He's in the hospital now,' said Jack Hopkins, 'and he makes such a devil of a noise when he walks about, that they're obliged to muffle him in a watchman's coat, for fear he should wake the patients.'
'Oh, that's nothing,' said Jack Hopkins. 'Is it, Bob?'
'Very singular things occur in our profession, I can assure you, Sir,' said Hopkins.
'Now,' said Jack Hopkins, 'just to set us going again, Bob, I don't mind singing a song.' And Hopkins, incited thereto by tumultuous applause, plunged himself at once into 'The King, God bless him,' which he sang as loud as he could, to a novel air, compounded of the 'Bay of Biscay,' and 'A Frog he would.' The chorus was the essence of the song; and, as each gentleman sang it to the tune he knew best, the effect was very striking indeed.
'Not to be endured,' replied Jack Hopkins; 'let's have the other verse, Bob.
'Shall I step upstairs, and pitch into the landlord?' inquired Hopkins, 'or keep on ringing the bell, or go and groan on the staircase?