hop tree

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Related to Hoptree: Ptelea trifoliata
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hop tree

hop tree

Small shrubby tree no more than 25 ft (8m) tall. Leaves look like poison ivy (do not confuse!) This is a small tree, whereas poison ivy is an ivy. Small greenish-white flowers with 4-5 thin petals. Fruit looks like round flat disks with bulge in the middle like a UFO, containing 2 seeds. (Not the same as the hops fruit used for making beer. That’s a different plant). The whole tree is anti-fungal, antibacterial, anticandida and has been used for calming irritated mucus membranes, asthma, expelling worms, fighting candida yeast and fungus. Roots used for fever, malaria, heartburn, roundworms, pinworms, poor digestion, asthma. Leaf tea used for asthma, digestion, stomach.
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arenicola Holly Georgia Ilex longpipes Holly Sarvis Ilex amelanchier Holly Tawnberry Ilex krugiana Hoptree California Ptelea crenulata Hoptree Common Ptelea trifoliata India-almond Terminalia catappa Joewood Jacquinia keyensis Juniper Common Juniperus communis Lebbek Albizia lebbeck Leucaena Littleleaf Leucaena retusa Licaria Florida Licaria triandra Lidflower Pale Calyptranthes pallens Locust Kelsey Robinia kelseyi Maidenbrush Savia bahamensis Maidenbrush Marlberry Ardisia escallonioides Mango Mangifera indica Mangrove Red Rhizophora mangle Milkbark Drypetes diversifolia Mountain-ash Showy Sorbus decora Mountain-ash Sitka Sorbus sitchensis Mountain-holly Nemopanthus collinus Nectandra Florida Nectandra coriacea Oak California black Quercus kelloggii Oak Delta Post Quercus stellata var.
All but six are new champions, the exceptions being a former champion honeylocust in Virginia that was reinstated when the Michigan champion lost points due to crown damage, a former champion cat-claw acacia in New Mexico that was reinstated when the Arizona champion was reported to have been incorrectly measured, a former champion common hoptree in Michigan reinstated when the Connecticut champion was reported to have been incorrectly measured, and two former co-champion American smoketrees in Indiana and Ohio, and a former champion Pacific red elder in Oregon, all reinstated due to incorrect measurement of the 1994 champions.
Since then, as an ongoing project, I've visited and photographed some 40 national champion trees from Connecticut to California, from the 1,300point General Sherman down to the 45- point California hoptree.