Alger, Horatio

(redirected from Horatio Alger)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Wikipedia.

Alger, Horatio

(ăl`jər), 1834–99, American writer of boys' stories, b. Revere, Mass. He wrote over 100 books for boys, the first, Ragged Dick, being published in 1867. By leading exemplary lives, struggling valiantly against poverty and adversity, Alger's heroes gain wealth and honor. His works were all extremely popular. Silas Snobden's Office Boy, which ran serially in the Argosy magazine in 1889–90, was not published as a book until 1973.

Bibliography

See H. R. Mayes, Alger (1928, repr. 1978); study by E. P. Hoyt (1983); bibliography by G. Scharnhorst and J. Bales (1981).

Alger, Horatio

author of a series of rags-to-riches stories. [Am. Lit.: Ragged Dick]

Alger, Horatio

(1834–1899) writer of boys’ stories where young men are instantly rewarded for honesty, perseverance, etc. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 19]
See: Success

Alger, Horatio

(1834–99) author; born in Revere, Mass. He graduated from Harvard Divinity School (1860), and became a Unitarian minister (1864), but resigned and settled in New York City (1866). His inspirational novels such as Ragged Dick (1867) made his name synonymous with the American ideal of young men gaining success through hard work. He died impoverished after giving his wealth to the poor.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
from April 5 to 7 to attend the Horatio Alger National Scholars Conference and participate in college-preparedness and other educational sessions.
Mario Frangoulis serves as International Ambassador for the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, underwriters of the public television program Mario Frangoulis Live With The Boston Pops.
We won't belabor here the travails Miller successfully confronted as a child, and which, followed by his success in adult life, form the basis for the Horatio Alger recognition.
That transformation follows a pattern well established in 19th-century American boys' culture through the stories of Horatio Alger, Jr.
1) Horatio Alger, Rough and Ready (Philadelphia: The John Winston Co.
The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans recently inducted John Paul DeJoria, chairman and chief executive officer of John Paul Mitchell Systems, as an honored lifetime member.
While he does not account for every moment in the history of American religious pluralism, readers will be amazed at how many different groups, events, and individuals he does include: Lyman Abbott, Hannah Adams, John Adams, Jane Addams, Sydney Ahlstrom, Catherine Albanese, Archibald Alexander, Horatio Alger, Ethan Allen, and Timothy Shay Arthur are all here, and those are only the "As.
His story starts in a tony Long Island suburb, and he writes frankly about his family of achievers and his time in prep school and then at Yale, where he loafed around as an unfocused student, conceding that he's no Horatio Alger, but making up for his lack of childhood poverty by asserting that he was born thrifty.
He's also the Horatio Alger stereotype, a rags-to-riches story, in love with the California that allowed this Austrian farm boy to find his fortunes, made him world-famous, ultimately, a hero.
Gaida, 41, is sort of a Horatio Alger of the nonprofit sector.
SOURCE: HORATIO ALGER ASSOCIATION ANNUAL YOUTH SURVEY
Shula has received countless prestigious awards recognizing his contributions, including: most recently, the 1993 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year Award, the 1994 Horatio Alger Award, the Bert Bell Award and the Pete Rozelle Award.