hormesis

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Related to Hormetic: Dose response

hormesis

[′hȯr·mə·səs]
(biology)
Providing stimulus by nontoxic amounts of a toxic agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Low concentrations of nitric oxide exert a hormetic effect on Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro.
Without an understanding of the mechanisms underlying a hormetic response, it is not appropriate to conclude that hormesis is a uniformly adaptive phenomenon.
2003), potential for hormetic stimulation (Calabrese 2004; Calabrese and Baldwin 2001), and cumulative impacts (Rajapakse et al.
Given the clear involvement of neural input in the cardiac and hepatic effector mechanisms studied here, similar factors may then produce hormetic responses to AC in these peripheral tissues.
Arbitrary standards such as these ignore thousands of studies disproving LNT and demonstrating radiation's hormetic effect --the principle that "the poison is in the dose.
HNE is known to act as a bifunctional, concentration- and cytokine-dependent growth regulator that might also affect glutathione metabolism and trigger hormetic antioxidant responses to severe stress (37), which might eventually be involved in consequential lowering of liver MDA, as was observed in the study.
Metformin and cancer: doses, mechanisms and the dandelion and hormetic phenomena.
There are an estimated 2,000 research publications on the subject of radiation hormesis, showing hormetic effects in a wide range of species from fruit flies to human beings.
Although it is not entirely clear from the evidence that the Discourses provide what this idea implies when considering the case of non-hormetic impressions (38), the underlying thought becomes clear when we consider hormetic impressions (as is clear from the passages just quoted, those are the impressions that Epictetus has in mind): whenever we consider a certain impression to be truthfully portraying a certain course of action, an impulse to act according to what is stated by that impression will necessarily take place in the soul.
Sea urchin ovaries were not significantly affected by cholecalciferol, but sea urchin testes demonstrated a significant hormetic effect, suggesting a sex-specific role for cholecalciferol.
This may be evidence of a hormetic effect, but the conditions of the experiment make this difficult to confirm.