Horten


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Horten

(hôr`tən), town (1995 pop. 16,059), Vestfold co., SE Norway, a port on the Oslofjord (an arm of the Skagerrak); chartered 1907. It is a commercial and industrial center. Horten was the main Norwegian naval base until after World War II, when its facilities were moved to Bergen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg said at the visit that many Norwegian counties envy Horten their high-tech companies, which Norspace is a major part of.
Radar tests on the replica show that the plane's radical, smooth design would indeed have given it a significant advantage against radar, according to Tom Dobrenz, a Northrop Grumman expert, who led the Horten replica project.
Isla and Dave Horten, of Ely, Cardiff, who are taking part in the Cash for a Month initiative PICTURE: Liz Pearce
In one of pic's drollest scenes, colleagues honor the dignified, pipe-smoking Horten at a retirement dinner featuring their unique take on toasts and party games.
But at 2am Norwegian Navy ship HNoMS Horten grounded on Gruinard.
The Horten had been taking part in the Neptune Warrior exercise involving forces from 11 nations.
Horten highlights the intimate relationship between the public and popular radio personalities, increasingly closely associated with their sponsor's products--Jack Benny and Jell-O, Bob Hope and Pepsodent toothpaste, for example.
Notre Dame's Shane Horten caused a fumble, teammate Cory Harris scored on a 3-yard run and Kay Borbath added two field goals to give Notre Dame a 37-0 lead after three quarters.
Fehn's latest museum, which houses Norway's national photographic collection and the Preus Fotomuseum, is on the top floor of a naval warehouse at Karljohansvern in Horten on the fjord south of Oslo (other floors are for the marine museum).
By Gerd Horten Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2002.
Gerd Horten University of California Press xiii + 218pp 29.
Miller's emphasis on Peiresc's implicit connection with Gassendi's other biographical subject, Tycho Brahe, is surely correct; the pairing of the antiquarian with the astronomer, both masters of observation, foreshadows the comic debut of such figures as Thomas Nabbes's Horten, "an owner of rarities and antiquities," who proudly displays "A weatherbeaten stone with an inscription / That is not legible but through an optick," convinced by its minute markings that it was once an altar "in some Sibills cave / Three thousand years ago" (Thomas Nabbes, The Bride, A Comedie (1640) IV: I:47-49).