hot electron


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hot electron

[′hät i′lek‚trän]
(electronics)
An electron that is in excess of the thermal equilibrium number and, for metals, has an energy greater than the Fermi level; for semiconductors, the energy must be a definite amount above that of the edge of the conduction band.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Henkel et al., "A graphene-based hot electron transistor," Nano Letters, vol.
The functional drain voltage ([V.sub.DS]) exaggerates several SCEs like DIBL, [V.sub.TH] roll-off, punchthrough, surface scattering, velocity saturation, impact ionization, and hot electron effect.
From discussion above, we know that the addition of negative charges weakens not only the hot electron effects, but also the quantum tunneling effects.
Led by professors Eray Aydil, David Norris and Xiaoyang Zhu, and graduate student William Tisdale, the group used a technique they described as hot electron extraction.
Two technologies are used to program and erase a flash device: hot electron injection and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, a quantum mechanical process in which electrons tunnel through a thin barrier in the presence of a high electric field.
Each time a CMBR photon interacts with a hot electron, it gains some energy, distorting the CMBR's spectrum in a characteristic way.
If, however, the device is inherently prone to hot electron effects, this screening can only be partially effective.
The hot electron source has been used on most scanning electron microscopes since their introduction in 1965.
Nozik, "Spectroscopy and hot electron relaxation dynamics in semiconductor quantum wells and quantum dots," Annual Review of Physical Chemistry, vol.
Their more precise experiment in fact shows that the equilibration of the temperatures for hot electron and cool ions is actually three times slower than previous measurements have shown and more than ten times slower than the mathematical model predicts.
Boston College researchers have observed the "hot electron" effect in a solar cell for the first time and successfully harvested the elusive charges using ultra-thin solar cells, opening a potential avenue to improved solar power efficiency, the authors report in the current online edition of Applied Physics Letters.When light is captured in solar cells, it generates free electrons in a range of energy states.