house sparrow

(redirected from House Sparrows)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

house sparrow:

see English sparrowEnglish sparrow
or house sparrow,
small bird, Passer domesticus, common throughout most of the world. English sparrows are 4 to 7 in. (10–18 cm) long, with short, stout bills.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
We also performed an additional experiment to investigate whether encounter rates affect EPP by distributing food in such a way as to either increase or decrease the likelihood that House Sparrows within a given area encounter one another then tested whether this was reflected in an increased or decreased EPP rate.
A few years ago, some alarms bells rang completely in London when the population of common house sparrows declined by upto 85% (ANI, 2009) and the most probable reason added by Hole et al.
House sparrows, blue tits and woodpigeons are common in the region, but the survey will show if this trend is continuing
It's actually a House Sparrow, but with a difference: it is xanthchromic.
According to the annual Big Garden Birdwatch 2013, the number of house sparrows has decreased by 63% since 1979 while starlings have declined by 82%.
House sparrows allowed to breed in our nest boxes spread like a virus.
It seems our country is now over-run with cats, so it's no wonder that the number of house sparrows and other native birds are declining.
RSPB spokesman Chris Collett assured twitchers both starlings and house sparrows remained a common feature in Merseyside gardens.
Venous blood gas and lactate values of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), boat-tailed grackles (Quiscalus major), and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) after capture by mist net, banding, and venipuncture.
Anyone with past or present information about house sparrows is encouraged to participate," a BNHS spokesperson said.
Sightings of house sparrows, robins, chaffinches and starlings have all declined since 1979, while wood pigeons and collared doves have shown big increases.