house

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house

1. Genealogy a family line including ancestors and relatives, esp a noble one
2. a commercial company; firm
3. Politics an official deliberative or legislative body, such as one chamber of a bicameral legislature
4. a quorum in such a body (esp in the phrase make a house)
5. a dwelling for a religious community
6. Astrology any of the 12 divisions of the zodiac
7. any of several divisions, esp residential, of a large school
8. a hotel, restaurant, bar, inn, club, etc., or the management of such an establishment
9. the audience in a theatre or cinema
10. a hall in which an official deliberative or legislative body meets
11. See full house
12. Curling the 12-foot target circle around the tee
13. Nautical any structure or shelter on the weather deck of a vessel

House

A structure serving as a dwelling for one or several families. A place of residence, an abode. The design of the house runs the gamut of nearly every design style that has ever existed. Although there are many reasons to preserve a particular house or group of houses, other external development factors usually dictate the ultimate fate of those in danger.

What does it mean when you dream about a house?

Because a house is a personal dwelling place, a house under construction shows inner work is being performed on the psyche. The condition of a house—whether it is in disrepair or it is fixed up and newly painted—is also symbolic.

house

1. A building or dwelling for human residence.
2. A theater, as a legitimate house. 3. (Colloq.) The auditorium in a theater; the audience space.

House

(dreams)
It is common to dream about houses. They usually symbolize our emotional and psychological selves. All of your experiences, stages of development, and parts of your conscious and unconscious life may be represented by that house. The house may be representing issues concerning a particular dilemma in your life, or it may be more general and comprehensive. Either way, if you pay attention to the details in this dream, you may learn a thing or two about yourself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Housing the houseless among the faithful should be the first priority before building a new and costly church or temple or a mosque for a God.
Soon after that, he emblematically addresses the Fool as "You houseless poverty," and synecdochially shifts to the plural with the "poor naked wretches" speech, which ends with a call for the redistribution of resources very similar to that of Gloucester cited above, declaring, "Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, / That thou mayst shake the superflux to them / And show the heavens more just" (3.
Poor naked wretches, wheresoer'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these?
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these?
But, in spite of all that could be done, many houses were burned and many families made houseless, and, besides, some of them had lost all but the clothes they had on.
After receiving Mason's reply requesting food and "tents for the houseless," he quickly sent three boxcars of supplies with promises of more to come.
As Yeats himself points out in a letter, "[Cuchulain] is the fool--wandering passive, houseless, and almost loveless.
More trash piles line a houseless lot on Via Escalare, facing Via Onda.
During his absence his house and farm were plundered, his family rendered houseless and homeless, and his property seized upon, by bands of ruffians, who recognized no authority but that of `mob law'.
With some uncertain notice, as might seem, Of vagrant dwellers in the houseless woods, Or of some hermit's cave, where by his fire The hermit sits alone.
After he comes into Pickwick's service, the following exchange gave Dickens's audience a somewhat harrowing glimpse of the lives of London poor, as Sam describes how he lived for a week under Waterloo bridge with "young beggars, male and female, as hasn't made a rise in their profession," and also "worn-out, starving, houseless creeturs as rolls themselves in dark corners o' them lonesome places" (242).