Hrothgar

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Hrothgar

Danish king desperately distressed by warrior-killing monster. [Br. Lit.: Beowulf]
See: Despair
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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"pa me paet gelaerdon leode mine, pa selestan, snotere ceorlas, peoden Hrodgar, paet ic pe sohte, forpan hie maegenes craeft min[n]e cupon ..." (415-17) ("My people, the best ones, the wise men, advised me, lord Hrothgar, to seek you because they knew of my great strength....")
Hrodgar praises Beowulf by saying that whoever the woman was who
Yet Hrodgar speaks and behaves as a Christian would; Beowulf acts in accordance with Christian mores; the poet often interposes Christian sentiments.
Hrodgar is, as many critics have noted, the most Christian-like personage of the poem.
Likewise, Hrodgar sees Beowulf as an agent sent by God to deliver Heorot from Grendel:
(1) See Marijane Osborn's essay "The Great Feud: Scriptural History and Strife in Beowulf." Instead of the more obvious references to the Bible I have mentioned, Osborn refers to four "scripturized" moments in the poem: Scyld's dynastic history (a "Germanic Abraham"), the Creation song, Grendel and Cain, and Hrodgar's sermon.
Such was also the name of one of the two sons of Hrodgar depicted in a famously poignant episode from the poem.