Hrothgar


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Hrothgar

Danish king desperately distressed by warrior-killing monster. [Br. Lit.: Beowulf]
See: Despair
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References in classic literature ?
And now far across the sea a brave man of the Goths, Beowulf by name, heard of the doings of Grendel, and he made up his mind to come to the aid of King Hrothgar.
And now these new-come warriors were led to King Hrothgar.
Hrothgar made a great feast, at which he gave rich gifts to Beowulf and his friends.
The water-witch was slain, and rejoicing, the hero returned to Hrothgar.
It relates, with the usual terse and unadorned power of really primitive poetry, how the hero Beowulf, coming over the sea to the relief of King Hrothgar, delivers him from a monster, Grendel, and then from the vengeance of Grendel's only less formidable mother.
About King Hrothgar are grouped his immediate retainers, the warriors, with whom he shares his wealth; it is a part of the character, of a good king to be generous in the distribution of gifts of gold and weapons.
The tale begins with King Hrothgar of Denmark, who has constructed the great hall Heorot for his people.
When a fearsome monster terrorises the realm of Danish King Hrothgar, a renowned warrior arrives to slay the demonic beast.
Hollywood stars William Hurt (left) and Joanne Whalley play Hrothgar and Rheda, Downton's Ed Speleers is Slean, with Kieran Bew (The Street) as Beowulf.
1) For example, Wealhtheow, wife of Hrothgar, in Beowulf, is shown offering a similar gesture of hospitality to the Geats when they are welcomed at Heorot (lines 555-565) and again, as they celebrate Grendel's death (lines 1030-1044).
Following Beowulf's defeat of Grendel, Hrothgar extends his parental bond to the hero.
35pm The realm of Danish King Hrothgar is terrorised by a fearsome monster.