Hrothgar


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Hrothgar

Danish king desperately distressed by warrior-killing monster. [Br. Lit.: Beowulf]
See: Despair
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References in classic literature ?
And now far across the sea a brave man of the Goths, Beowulf by name, heard of the doings of Grendel, and he made up his mind to come to the aid of King Hrothgar.
And now these new-come warriors were led to King Hrothgar.
Hrothgar made a great feast, at which he gave rich gifts to Beowulf and his friends.
The water-witch was slain, and rejoicing, the hero returned to Hrothgar.
It relates, with the usual terse and unadorned power of really primitive poetry, how the hero Beowulf, coming over the sea to the relief of King Hrothgar, delivers him from a monster, Grendel, and then from the vengeance of Grendel's only less formidable mother.
About King Hrothgar are grouped his immediate retainers, the warriors, with whom he shares his wealth; it is a part of the character, of a good king to be generous in the distribution of gifts of gold and weapons.
The "stellar" cast assembled by ITV Studios included Hartlepool-born Kieran Bew as Beowulf, Joanne Whalley as Rheda and William Hurt as Hrothgar.
The series is ITV Studios' biggest ever production and its big name cast also features American Body Heat star William Hurt, who plays King Hrothgar, and Joanne Whalley, who most recently played Katherine of Aragon in BBC's Wolf Hall, as his wife Rheda.
Bew plays the eponymous hero, and is joined by an acclaimed cast, including William Hurt as Hrothgar and Joanne Whalley as Rheda.
She is the wife of the great leader Hrothgar (William Hurt) who, as the series begins, has just died.