Hsin-Tien

Hsin-Tien

 

a late Neolithic archaeological culture that flourished in western Kansu Province in northwestern China. One of the painted pottery cultures, Hsin-tien replaced the Ch’ich’ia culture, although the two apparently were not genetically linked. The primary occupations of the population were land cultivation and the raising of hogs and cattle. Traces of a copper-smelting works have been found. Hsin-tien apparently existed at the time of the Yin and early Chou dynasties in the Huang Ho Valley.

REFERENCE

Andersson, J. G. “Researches Into the Prehistory of the Chinese.” Bulletin of the Museum of Far Eastern A ntiquities, no. 15. Stockholm, 1943.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lithograph experts such as Chung You-hui came to the conclusion that the four artworks were original copies after analyzing the signatures on them, according to NMH Director Liao Hsin-tien. In addition, the absence of codes on the lithographs, a practice that began after 1963, led experts to assume that the prints were produced prior to the early 1960s.
99, An-Chung Road, Hsin-Tien, New Taipei City, Taiwan
NMH director Liao Hsin-tien said the exhibitions were important because they reflect the development of Taiwan's ceramic art, which showcases a mixture of eastern and western art.