Hsüan Tsang

(redirected from Hsuan Tsang)

Hsüan Tsang

 

Born circa 600; died 664. Chinese traveler. Buddhist monk.

From 629 to 645, Hsüan Tsang traveled in Middle and Central Asia and India. In his work Ta T’ang hsi yü chi (Notes on the Countries of the West), concluded in 648, he provided much information on the geography, ethnography, and history of the regions he visited, including the Tien-Shan and the Pamirs.

References in periodicals archive ?
Hiuen Tsang (also Xuanzang, Hsuan Tsang) was the celebrated Chinese traveler, a Buddhist monk, who visited India in Ancient Times.
Delhi-based Vineet Kacker, known for his work inspired by Buddhist architecture, made chortens called "Hsuan Tsang's Dream I, II, III", referencing the pilgrim's 17-year journey to India and back (figure 2).
Caption: 2 "Hsuan Tsang's Dream I, II, III", by Vineet Kacker.
THE STORY of the Chinese Buddhist pilgrim Hsuan Tsang's journey to India got a modern reinterpretation in a musical at the Aiwan- e- Ghalib auditorium on Wednesday night.
" During his stay in India, which stretched across 17 years, Hsuan Tsang had also learnt about Hinduism and the idea of Shiva the destroyer, so we thought it would be an ideal opening for the musical," Yang said.
He became entranced by the recently translated histories written by Chinese Buddhist pilgrims to India, particularly that of Hsuan Tsang who traveled in India in the seventh century.
There are many versions of this sutra but the most popular version is that of the Chinese monk, Hsuan Tsang.
Purdy); (9) "Following Tripitaka: Hsuan Tsang in History and Literature" (Paul Ragan); (10) "The Ancient Shu Culture, Evidence of Civilization" (Leah Renzi); (11) "Aspects of Miao Costume and Clothing" (Judith Lynn Sebesta); (12) "China and Industrialization: A Curricular Unit" (Curtis L.
Xuanzang (Hsuan Tsang in the Wade-Giles transliteration) traveled through Central and South Asia (ca.
Hsuan Tsang was more precise in his detail description of the routes and the distance he took when he visited the various Buddhist sites in his time..
All the sites mentioned by Fa Hien seems to agree well with the later records of Hsuan Tsang, except one place ...
The most important sources are Harsa's own inscriptions, a "biographical" courtly romance by Banabhatta, and a lengthy traveller's account by the Chinese Buddhist pilgrim Yuan Chwang (Hsuan Tsang).