Hu Yaobang


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Related to Hu Yaobang: Tiananmen Square, Hua Guofeng

Hu Yaobang

(ho͞o` you`bäng`), 1915–89, Chinese Communist political leader, b. Hunan prov. A protegé of Deng XiaopingDeng Xiaoping
or Teng Hsiao-p'ing
, 1904–97, Chinese revolutionary and government leader, b. Sichuan prov. Deng became a member of the Chinese Communist party while studying in France (1920–25) and later (1926) attended Sun Yatsen Univ., Moscow.
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, Hu became general secretary of the Communist party in 1980 and party chairman in 1981, effectively replacing Hua GuofengHua Guofeng
or Hua Kuo-feng
, 1920–2008, Chinese Communist leader. He was relatively unknown until he became minister of public security and deputy premier in 1975. As Mao Zedong's designated heir, he became premier following Zhou Enlai's death (Jan.
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 as leader of the Communist party. In the wake of student demonstrations for greater democracy, to which he was thought to be sympathetic, he was forced to resign as party secretary in 1987. In 1989, upon his death, students renewed their protests in Tiananmen SquareTiananmen Square,
large public square in Beijing, China, on the southern edge of the Inner or Tatar City. The square, named for its Gate of Heavenly Peace (Tiananmen), contains the monument to the heroes of the revolution, the Great Hall of the People, the National Museum of
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.

Hu Yaobang

1915--89, Chinese statesman; leader of the Chinese Communist Party (1981--87)
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of them, like Hu Yaobang and his successor Zhao Ziyang, were genuine idealists who felt that the Party's controls must be loosened now that the revolution was an accomplished fact.
Our results show Hu Yaobang, Jiang Zemin, and Xi Jinping recruited faction members who shared native place, school, and work ties with them.
Deng Xiaoping had just eradicated the politically liberal Hu Yaobang and started a struggle against bourgeois liberalization.
More contentious than the show's central figure is the novel appearance of actors depicting several other controversial politicians, among them the late reformist Communist Party chief Hu Yaobang, who Deng ousted.
The protests began in April 1989 as a demonstration by university students in Beijing to mourn the death of Hu Yaobang, the reformist Communist Party chief who had been ousted by paramount leader Deng Xiaoping.
Mourning over the April 15th death of former General Secretary Hu Yaobang. Hu was a rare liberal light in the Communist Party, advocating a freer press, and the man behind the rehabilitation of millions of people persecuted during the Cultural Revolution.
What started as a commemoration of the late General Secretary Hu Yaobang soon escalated after a news headline from Deng Xiaoping accused a small group of opportunists of trying to overthrow the communist party and wreak havoc.
The spark for the Tiananmen Square protests was the death of reformist leader Hu Yaobang, who was popular among young people.
This alliance of resistance was what toppled previous reform-minded leaders Hu Yaobang and Zhao Ziyang before the Tiananmen incident, when they were seen as jeopardizing Party control.
Above all, he is determined to avoid the fate of previous Chinese leaders such as Hu Yaobang and Zhao Ziyang, who lost their jobs after a critical mass of their opponents came to believe that economic and political reform jeopardized party control.
Xi attended Tsinghua University and as he rose through the ranks, he was sent to Zhengding and then to Fujian in the south of China by Hu Yaobang, the Party's leader at the time.