Hua-yen Buddhism

Hua-yen Buddhism

(hwä-yŭn) [Chin.,=flower garland], school of Chinese Buddhism centering on the Avatamsaka Sutra [flower garland sutra]. This school has no Indian counterpart. Hua-yen classifies Buddhist scriptures and doctrines on five levels, with its own teaching as the highest and most complete. According to the school, all phenomena arise simultaneously from the universal principle of the Dharma-realm. The ultimate principle and manifested things mutually interpenetrate without obstruction. At the same moment all phenomena both embody the Absolute, and reflect and are identified with each other. The first master of the school was Tu-shun (557–640); he was succeeded by Chih-yen (602–668), Fa-ts'ang (643–712), Ch'eng-kuan (737–838), and Ts'ung-mi (780–841), who was also a master of the Ch'an or Zen school. The name also appears as Hwa-yen.

Bibliography

See C. C. Chang, The Buddhist Teaching of Totality (1971); F. Cook, Hua-yen Buddhism (1977).

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References in periodicals archive ?
Entry Into the Inconceivable: An Introduction to Hua-yen Buddhism.
Chih-yen (602-668) and the Foundations of Hua-yen Buddhism.
The Taoist Influence on Hua-yen Buddhism A Case of the Scinicization of Buddhism in China," Chung-Hwa Buddhist Journal, 13, 2000 <http://www.
Vairocana also plays an important role in Chinese Hua-Yen Buddhism, which serves as another link in the exhibition as the narrative winds its way chronologically through Tibet and toward its relationship with China in the last section, Toward East Asia.
Hua-yen Buddhism with typical Chinese positivism, reinterprets the Buddhist metaphysic as an organic interconnectedness of all things, transforming the notion of emptiness into an affirmative source of appreciation of the world.
As time passed, this idea came into very close association with the idea of sunyata, especially in Chinese Hua-Yen Buddhism, and sunyata and tathagata often were used in Hua-Yen as "alternative expressions of the same reality," with sunyata emphasizing the epistemological or ontological aspects of the Absolute while tathagata garbha emphasized the "soteriological" and "practical.
11) This echoes what Jin Park has argued in relation to ethics in Hua-yen Buddhism.