Huaca Prieta

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Huaca Prieta

 

the remains of a settlement dating from the second half of the third and the first half of the second millennium B.C., situated at the mouth of the Chicama River on the coast of Peru. Excavations have uncovered the remains of small subterranean dwellings, stone implements, and fragments of cloth and fishing nets. Pottery was not yet known. Also found were early examples of ancient Peruvian art: depictions of human beings, condors, snakes, and crabs carved on gourds or woven in cloth. Fishing and gathering were the chief occupations of the inhabitants. Evidence of the cultivation of cotton, gourds, squash, chili peppers, and beans was found in Huaca Prieta, the first known example of plant cultivation in a culture ignorant of pottery. Remains have been discovered on the Peruvian coast that belong to the same culture as that of Huaca Prieta.

REFERENCES

Berezkin, Iu. E. “Nachalo zemledeliia na peruanskom poberezh’e.” Sovetskaia arkheologiia, 1969, no. 1.
Bird, J. B. “Pre-ceramic Cultures in Chicama and Virú.” In A Reappraisal of Peruvian Archaeology. Assembled by W. C. Bennett. (Memoirs of the Society for American Archaeology, no. 4.) Menasha, Wis., 1948.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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A late Pleistocene human presence at Huaca Prieta, Peru, and early Pacific Coastal adaptations.
Some of those artifacts, found at a prehistoric settlement in Peru called Huaca Prieta, are 15,000 years old and include handwoven baskets, stone tools and what's left of meals made from marine- and land-based foods, with burnt and cut bones that are signs of cooking with fire, a study in the journal (http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/5/e1602778) Science Advances  found.
Chemical analyses of fabric unearthed at Huaca Prieta, an ancient site on Peru's northern coast, unveiled the presence of indigo dye roughly 1,600 years before this fabric coloring showed up in Egypt, the team reports September 14 in Science Advances.
The new discovery joins other "firsts" at Huaca Prieta, says archaeologist Daniel Sandweiss of the University of Maine in Orono.