Huayna Capac


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Related to Huayna Capac: Atahualpa, Manco Capac, Huascar

Huayna Capac

(wī`nä kä`päk), d. 1525, Inca of Peru, last of the great emperors. The Inca empire reached its greatest extent and power under his rule, but disruptive forces were already at work. Their action was hastened by Huayna Capac's decision to divide the empire by leaving the recently conquered kingdom of Quito to his favorite son, AtahualpaAtahualpa
, d. 1533, favorite son of Huayna Capac, Inca of Peru. At his father's death (1525) he received the kingdom of Quito while his half-brother, the legitimate heir Huáscar, inherited the rest of the Inca empire.
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, and the rest to the legitimate heir, HuáscarHuáscar
, d. 1533, Inca of Peru; son of Huayna Capac. At his father's death (1525) he became emperor, but had to share the empire with his younger half-brother, Atahualpa.
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. War between the brothers had just ended when Francisco Pizarro began his conquest. Huayna Capac's third son, Manco CapacManco Capac,
d. 1544, last of the Inca rulers, son of Huayna Capac. After the deaths of Huáscar and Atahualpa, Manco Capac was crowned (1534) emperor by the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro but was tolerated only as a puppet.
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 was the last Inca to succumb to the Spanish.
References in periodicals archive ?
En la decada que siguio a aquella en que surgio la primera novela sobre indios colombianos --Yngermina o la hija de Calamar (1844) de Juan Jose Nieto--, el abogado boyacense Felipe Perez publico una saga de cuatro novelas ambientadas en los ultimos dias del Tawantinsuyu y en la primera decada de la campana conquistadora librada por los espanoles en Peru: Huayna Capac (1856), Atahuallpa (1856), Los Pizarros (1857) y Jilma (1858).
She succeeds in both endeavors, presenting an excellent discussion of how the Inca maintained a historical record without a written language, followed by a detailed analysis of the architecture of the palaces and estates of the Emperor Huayna Capac, the last Inca to rule before the arrival of the Spanish.
The city was abandoned and forgotten after 1527, following the death of Pachacuti Inca's successor, Huayna Capac, from smallpox (introduced by the Spanish invaders).
There are some well-fashioned stone niches, a stone chamber re-worked into a watermill by seventeenth-century Spaniards, and the remains of a great palace, that of Huayna Capac, the last of the great Incas, who ruled from 1493 until his premature death in 1525.