Hubble


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Hubble: Hubble constant, Hubble law

Hubble

Edwin Powell. 1889--1953, US astronomer, noted for his investigations of nebulae and the recession of the galaxies

hubble

[′həb·əl]
(astronomy)
A unit of astronomical distance equal to 109 light-years or 9.4605 × 1024 meters.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hubble operations team then did a 'running restart' of the malfunctioning gyro.
The Hubble image of the nebula, which is 6,500 light-years from Earth, is a combination of 24 separate exposures taken over three months.
This surprising connection is just one revelation to come out of a four-day symposium at Hubble's headquarters, the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore.
Hubble was expected to have a useful lifetime of about 15 years.
After Hubble had eased itself into orbit and fired its mirrors, it began beaming back images of space.
1 Hubble has captured images of galaxies so far away that the view we get of them comes from a period when the universe had just been created.
One of NASA's grandest achievements, Hubble has peered into the far recesses of the universe and provided humbling glimpses of stars at the moments of their birth and death.
I respect Mr Hubble has his own take on matters, but why is this man always wanting to modify or discredit other readers views?
The observed Hubble constant that is commonly referred to in the literature is a measure of space expansion with respect to LTDs.
“Hubble has a unique ability to draw the public into exploring space,” says creator of Hubble Star Cards and owner of TerraZoom, John Williams.
Installed by shuttle astronauts during the 2008 Servicing Mission (SM4), the WFC3 is Hubble's most technologically advanced visible spectrum instrument.