Hubble's variable nebula

Hubble's variable nebula

(NGC 2261) A fan-shaped reflection nebula in the constellation Monoceros that is illuminated by the variable star R Monocerotis. R Mon, an infrared source, is a very young stellar object surrounded by a disk of dust and ejecting a bipolar outflow; this causes the brightness and outline of the nebula to vary. The nebula is a Herbig–Haro object. It takes its name from the great US astronomer Edwin Hubble, who first noticed its variability.

Hubble's Variable Nebula

[′həb·əlz ¦ver·ē·ə·bəl ′neb·yə·lə]
(astronomy)
A variable-brightness nebula associated with variable stars and fan-shaped in appearance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most famous and best understood of these enigmatic jewels is Hubble's Variable Nebula (NGC 2261), which is the peculiar nebula associated with R Monocerotis (R Mon).
Hubble's Variable Nebula was the first object photographed by the 200-inch Hale Telescope at Mt Palomar in 1949.
All but one, Hubble's variable nebula, are generally poorly studied.
It was about 1' across when I viewed it, but NGC 6729 is a variable nebula much like the celebrated Hubble's Variable Nebula (NGC 2261) in Monoceros.
Hubble's Variable Nebula was originally discovered by William Herschel in 1783, but its variability was only noticed by Edwin Hubble in 1916.
This wide-field image of northern Monoceros includes the Cone Nebula, Hubble's Variable Nebula, and the open cluster Trumpler 5 at right.
Of the few in the sky the most well known is Hubble's Variable Nebula (NGC 2261) in Monoceros.
NGC 2261, also known as Hubble's Variable Nebula or Caldwell 46, is a remarkable object lying 1.
These include NGC 2261, Hubble's Variable Nebula, which reflects light from the young star R Monocerotis, and Gyulbudaghian's Nebula, illuminated by PV Cephei (see the images on the facing page).
Also known as Hubble's Variable Nebula, NGC 2261 fans outward from R Monocerotis, a dust-shrouded binary star estimated to be 2,500 light- years distant and only 300,000 years old - a mere infant (though a mighty one) in stellar terms.
Since 1916 it has also been known as Hubble's Variable Nebula, following Edwin Hubble's discovery that it can change shape on a time scale of months (CCD Astronomy: Winter 1996, page 42).
It resembles the better-known Hubble's Variable Nebula C46 (NGC 2261) far to the north in Monoceros.