Hubble deep field


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Hubble deep field

An undistinguished – and therefore considered ‘typical’ – area of sky that was the subject of an extremely long observation taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The resulting image has enabled astonomers to study the ordinary galaxies at the edge of the Universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investigation of age and metallicity gradients and dust extinction in disc galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field.
Unfortunately, spectra can be obtained only for relatively bright objects, so the distances of the faintest galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field remained unknown.
One caveat, Labbe notes, is that Hubble Deep Field South is an extremely tiny patch of sky, taking up less than 1 percent of the area of the full moon.
One is the Hubble Deep Field image made with the orbiting observatory in 1996.
Senior editor JOSHUA ROTH was among the journalists in attendance when the original Hubble Deep Field was unveiled eight years ago and again when its Ultra Deep successor debuted last March.
Since the completion of the Hubble Deep Field North, several sky surveys have intensified the flood of data.
The Hubble Deep Field campaign also proved that releasing a stunning image within days of acquisition could capture the imagination of the astronomical community and the public alike.
Richer of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and their colleagues compared the 1995 images of the Hubble Deep Field North, the region viewed in exquisite detail by the Hubble Space Telescope, with those that the telescope took 2 years later.
Our exposure captured HST as it was imaging the Hubble Deep Field North as part of NASA's Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) project (www.stsci.edu).
The group used Chandra to examine a patch of sky that includes the Hubble Deep Field, a region scrutinized in visible light by the Hubble Space Telescope.
Observations of the Hubble Deep Field North and South, as the patches of sky are now called, have produced the sharpest images of galaxies ever made.
SEVEN YEARS AFTER THE FIRST HUBBLE DEEP FIELD (HDF) PROVIDED a view of the faintest and most distant galaxies ever seen, a team of astronomers has determined redshifts for thousands of them--and has confirmed its earlier suspicions that vigorous star formation began surprisingly early.