Hubnerite

Hubnerite

 

(named for the 19th-century German mineralogist A. Hübner), a mineral rich in manganese, a member of the isomorphous series of wolframite; 17.6–23.4 percent manganese. Chemical formula, (Mn, Fe)W04. Hubnerite crystals are typically brownish red with a violet cast and have a semimetallic luster.

References in periodicals archive ?
From the Mundo Nuevo-Tamboras mining district, La Liberdad Department, Burillo had about 50 beautiful pieces, mined in September 2009, showing very sharp, bladed, lustrous red-brown hubnerite crystals to 1.
Then, from the Himalaya mine, just outside the city of La Paz, there was hubnerite, as loose, compound, bladed crystals from 5 to 12 cm, bright shiny black, with red flashes infrequently showing (these crystals have been verified as hubnerite, not ferberite, and as such are a rarity for Bolivia).
Hubnerite with Quartz Mundo Nuevo Mine, Pasto Bueno Dist.
In September, the Mundo Nuevo mine gave up dazzling hubnerite specimens showing razor-sharp, opaque black, bladed crystals to 2.
Besides rhodochrosite, the most important collector species at the Sweet Home mine are fluorite, tetrahedrite/tennantite, pyrite, quartz, sphalerite, galena, hubnerite, bornite, fluorapatite and chalcopyrite.
The mines of the Pasto Bueno district have produced the world's best hubnerite crystals, and they have also yielded a few nice specimens of hollow hubnerite molds after bipyramidal or octahedral crystals resting on a mixture of quartz with greenish muscovite.
In 1977 he reopened the now-famous Sweet Home mine in Alma, Colorado to mine specimen rhodochrosite, hubnerite, fluorite, svanbergite and goyazite crystals.
Red-brown hubnerite crystals, rarely twinned, have been found in superficial parts of some veins (Bandy 1944).
Rarely, native gold coating hubnerite has been observed at this locality.
It has long been famous for hubnerite, but the most recently found hubnerite crystals have been, in general, smaller than those of the past: they range up to 5 cm, usually as loose singles broken off from quartz druses.
Late in 2002, a single pocket in the Mundo Nuevo mine near Pasto Bueno, Ancash, Peru produced sharp, highly lustrous hubnerite crystals to 4 cm on beds of thin-prismatic quartz crystals (with some Japan-law twins); some specimens also sport pyrite cubes to 5 cm and lustrous crystals of tetrahedrite to 3 cm.
Morococha, Yauli Province, Peru is the source of some new, bright, very pretty dark brown hubnerite in sprays and clusters of sprays of bladed crystals to 1 cm individually: these are dead ringers for the goethite sprays of the Pikes Peak batholith, Colorado.