Hucbald


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Hucbald

(hŭk`bôld), c.840–930, Flemish monk, composer and writer, formerly thought to be the author of the Musica enchiriadis (see polyphonypolyphony
, music whose texture is formed by the interweaving of several melodic lines. The lines are independent but sound together harmonically. Contrasting terms are homophony, wherein one part dominates while the others form a basically chordal accompaniment, and monophony,
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). He wrote a musical treatise, De institutione harmonica, but he is more important as a biographer of saints.
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Sullivan, a musicologist associated with the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, considers the ancient origins of the association between speech and music and statements of structural similarity between them in ninth-century music handbooks and treatises--Aurelian of RA[c]A[acute accent]me's Musica disciplina, Hucbald of St.
This compact overview of the writings of Boethius and others as the Carolingians would have understood them provides the background for a more detailed examination of Hucbald's ideas, the Enchiriadis treatises, and other theoretical writings.
Palisca), Hucbald, Guido and John on Music (Yale University Press, 1978); Kenneth Levy, Gregorian Chant and the Carolingions (Princeton UP, 1998); James McKinnon, The Temple, the Church Fathers and Early Western Chant (Variorum, 1998); Rosamund McKitterick, Charlemagne: The Formation of a European Identity (Cambridge UP, 2008); Chris Wickham, Framing the Early Middle Ages: Europe and the Mediterranean, 400-800 (Oxford U P, 2005).
John "Cotton;' De Musica, 16, in Hucbald, Guido, and Iohn on Music: Three Medieval Treatises, trans.Warren Babb (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1978), 133.
Byzantine musicians did not attempt to harness the ancient system to their practical needs as Western theorists were to do from the time of Hucbald. Nor, however, did they evolve a comprehensive system of their own.
Hucbald, using the same form of tetrachord, contrived a scale corresponding to that of the ancient Greek diatonic system, though that was based on downward tetrachords of the form tone-tone-semitone and called for an extra note at the bottom, whereas Hucbald's required one at the top.
A few candidates have been proposed over the years, including Hucbald (Gerbert, 1784), Otgarius (Morin, 1891), Hoger of Werden (Morin, 1895) and Otger of Laon (J.
Such a decomposition of the diatonic intervals is found in Hucbald, albeit in garbled form, and in later treatises such as the Contrapunctus of Prosdocimo de' Beldomandi.(2)
Its last flowering may be located in the first two decades of the tenth century in the Low Countries, not long before renewed stirrings of monastic reform in Lotharingia prompted new hagiographical directions.(13) At the hands of some of the ablest writers of the age - Alcuin, Einhard, Jonas, Hilduin, Hucbald - the genre became marked by a striving for stylistic effect, historical complexity and theological depth.
73), that of the theory of the modes found in Hucbald or in treatises such as Musica enchiriadis and Alia musica.
He published an edition of the Micrologus (Corpus Scriptorum de Musica, 4 [n.p.: American Institute of Musicology, 1955]), on which the English translation by Warren Babb (in Hucbald, Guide, and John on Music, ed.
Musica enchiriadis is one of the two most important works on music theory from the early middle ages; the other is by Hucbald (De harmonica institutione).