Huckleberry Finn


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Finn, Huckleberry

19th-century picaresque teenager travels down the Mississippi on a raft. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

after his supposed death, he dons a girl’s dress and goes into town to gain information. [Am. Lit.: Mark Twain Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

refuses to turn in Jim, the fugitive slave. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

mischievous, sharp-witted boy has many adventures. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

his mother dead; his father dies toward end of novel. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
See: Orphan

Finn, Huckleberry

unconventional and resourceful runaway boy. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
References in periodicals archive ?
In popular culture, Huckleberry Finn conjures up images of the fresh-faced All-American boy, played by cute child stars like Mickey Rooney, Ron Howard, or Elijah Wood.
Sadly, students in Massachusetts and across most of the country may soon have to seek out Huckleberry Finn on their own, because it isn't included in national K-12 education standards that have been adopted by 46 states and the District of Columbia.
The programme was so long because it was the adaptation of two separate books, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, a children's book by Mark Twain from 1876 and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which is often mistaken for a children's book but is actually one of the greatest ever works of American literature.
32); and James Baldwin who at an speaking engagement in Berkeley, California in 1979 recollected that as a boy reading AHF, "I did not agree at all with the moral predicament of Huckleberry Finn concerning Nigger Jim.
The reason for Huck's sudden fame is the decision to rewrite history - and remove all references to the N-word in both The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
Most readers know Mark Twain as the folksy, humorous author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer.
I'm glad that my review of Axel Nissen's book, Manly Love (in the March-April issue) encouraged him to read Huckleberry Finn, and that he found it to be a masterpiece, as do I.
As a result they will be asked to enter their Huckleberry Finn, rather than their Pin, and will have to select how much sausage and mash they want.
In her charming book A Chance Meeting (on, as the subtitle puts it, "intertwined lives of American writers and artists") Rachel Cohen observes, of Mark Twain's second bankruptcy, "People said that the distractions of his worries and of the traveling [on a lecture tour] to bail himself out were why he never wrote another Huckleberry Finn, though perhaps no one has two Huckleberry Finns to write.
For Smiley, the most notable problem with Huckleberry Finn was that Twain took the public question of race and removed it to the private sphere.
This essay revisits the decades-long debate about racial representation in Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and suggests, looking beyond the rigid binary of either demanding a ban on the novel or belittling its racially offensive aspects, that in racial terms Twain's creation of the Huck-Jim relationship reflects what was in the author's own life and worldview a muddled terrain of good intentions, confusion, wavering, and inconsistency.
Only this: Twain's acknowledged masterpiece, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, inspires almost universal ambivalence among its biggest fans.