Huldah


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Huldah

(hŭl`də), in the Bible, prophetess, consulted by Josiah, King of Judah (640–609 B.C.) on the finding of the Law. She prophesied that divine judgment would fall on Judah, but that Josiah would die in peace before that judgment fell. While the first part of her prophecy was fulfilled, Josiah died in battle.

Huldah

tells of impending disaster for the idolatrous. [O.T.: II Kings 22:14–19]
References in classic literature ?
The next morning at recess Rebecca observed Minnie telling the tale with variations to Huldah Meserve.
Members present included Felitza Johnson, Clara Jackson, Orena Blum, Mamie Fredericks, Pauline Hall, Lena Lindner, Huldah Pflanz, Annie Miller, Daisy Sutter, Emma Woll, Anna Cook, Laura Pauletich, Eva Owens, Grace Beasley, Katie Franklin, Lizzie Winters and Katie Pflanz.
The Bible specifically calls three women "prophetess" (neviah): Miriam, Deborah and Huldah.
Huldah is identified as an authoritative Jerusalem prophet in 2 Kings 22, but like all nine female prophets mentioned in scripture, we have no writings of hers to contemplate.
In one final insult, Josiah himself had been assured by the prophetess Huldah (2 Kings 22.
Priod ffyddlon a chariadus Megan, brawd annwyl i'r diweddar Huldah, Eurwen, Megan, Llewelyn a Meirion, brawd yng nghyffraith ac ewythr hoffus ei nithoedd a neiaint.
Clearly, in Judaism the male prophets Isaiah, Amos, Hosea, and Jeremiah, and the female prophets Miriam and Huldah, etc.
This deeply grieved the king, so he sent advisors to consult with the prophet Huldah.
The 15 papers consider such topics as Isaiah and the oldest "biblical" prophetic narrative, from salvation to doom: Isaiah's message in the Hezekiah story, whether Huldah was a cunning career woman, Haggai and Zechariah in the stories of Ezra and 1 Esdras, and an early modern young prophet: the heavenly messages of Evert Willemsz Bogaert and their recognition in 1622-23.
One of the stories has the same name as the novel; invokes the same nursery rhyme that serves as a matrix for the novel; is centered on "bird-boy" David and his guardians Theodore and Huldah, who are characters in the novel; and raises the same questions regarding David's identity and role.
He holds the book that Josiah found not to be an early edition of Deuteronomy 5-28, the majority opinion, but rather he finds the book of the law to be the Song of Moses in Deuteronomy 32, a passage responsible in his opinion for the indictment that the prophet Huldah issued against Israel (2 Kgs 22:16-17).
Similarly, many Orthodox Jews defend the ordination of women by citing examples of biblical female leaders like Miriam, sister of Moses, and Huldah, a prophetess.