Hulagu Khan

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Hulagu Khan

(ho͞olä`go͞o khän), 1217–65, Mongol conqueror, grandson of Jenghiz Khan. His brother Mangu, grand khan of the Mongols, directed him to quell a revolt in Persia. In 1256, in the course of his successful campaign, his forces virtually exterminated the powerful AssassinAssassin
, European name for the member of a secret order of the Ismaili sect of Islam. They are known as Nizaris after Nizar ibn al-Mustansir, whom they supported as caliph; the European term Assassin is derived from the Arabic for "users of hashish.
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 sect. Moving west to enlarge his conquests, he sacked and burned Baghdad in 1258 (executing the last Abbasid caliph) and captured Aleppo and Damascus in 1260. Further advances were checked by the Mamluks, who defeated him (Sept., 1260) at the decisive battle of Ayn Jalut (Goliath's Well) in Syria. Hulagu withdrew to Azerbaijan, adopted Islam, and founded the Il-khan dynasty. His khanate, which included all of Persia, endured until 1335, when it was divided into five parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pero la conexion en ese momento no es del todo gratuita; sabemos que un general nestoriano del Ilkhan de Persia Hulegu, de nombre Ketbugha, combatio contra los mamelucos y murio en 'Ayn Jalut, en 1260, proclamandose descendiente de los Reyes Magos (Cardini, Franco, Los Reyes Magos ..., op.
He was exonerated of any wrongdoing toward the end of Hulegu's reign, when his brother Shams al-Din Muhammad was promoted to the office of chief minister (sahib diwan), and he sought revenge on his enemies.
In astronomy, Khawajah (Master or Teacher) Tusi, as he was known during his lifetime (after his death, Tusi was often referred to as Ustaz Al-Bashariyyah -- teacher of mankind -- as well as Al MuaACAyallim Al Thalith, the third teacher after Aristotle and Al Farabi), built an observatory at Maragha in northwestern Iran, where renowned scientists, including astronomers from China, participated in research and scientific observations to help the Mongol ruler Hulegu in his conquests.
Among the topics are a comparison of the experience by Mongols and Ottomans, aspects of Mongol strategy in the light of Western sources, the Magyar example of predatory nomadism in the Carpathian Basin 860-955, re-examining Hulegu's offensive into the Jazir and northern Syria in light of recent research, the Mongol invasions in Japan, and transcultural representations of violence in recent Western historical novels.
Power remained in the hands of the Phagmodru family (an appendage to Hulegu in 1251) until 1434.
Thus we find letters from the Mongol leaders Hulegu Il-Khan and Ghazan Il-Khan of Persia (Letters 72, 81).
Hulagu Khan, also known as Hulegu or was a Mongol ruler who conquered much of Southwest Asia.
The conquest of Baghdad by Hulegu and the Mongols in 1258 effectively ended Abbasid and Seljuk control of the Tigris-Euphrates area; it was incorporated into the emerging Mongol Il-Khanate.
The Ilkhanids (1256-1353), a Mongol dynasty that ruled in Iran, was founded by Hulegu, a grandson of Genghis Khan.
[US Vice-President Dick] Cheney and [US Secretary of State Colin] Powell killed and destroyed in Baghdad more than Hulegu of the Mongols.
Farther west, the Il-Khanid dynasty of Iran, descended from Mongol ruler Hulegu (c.