gastrointestinal tract

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Related to Human gastrointestinal tract: gastrointestinal system, Gastric system

gastrointestinal tract

[¦ga·strō‚in′tes·tən·əl ′trakt]
(anatomy)
The stomach and intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preventing hydrophobic particles from agglomerating increases the specific surface area of the material in the human gastrointestinal tract, allowing better absorption into the bloodstream, he added.
The prenatal development of enterochromaffin cells in the human gastrointestinal tract. J Anat 1963; 97: 377-387.
Mohammad Pourhomayoun et al, [5] described a wireless capsule endoscopy has become a popular method to visualize and diagnose the human gastrointestinal tract. In this method through extensive Monte Carlo simulations for radio frequency emission signals within the required power and bandwidth range.
For example, the human gastrointestinal tract, which contains 95 % of the the human microbiome, hosts a genetically diverse microbial population that plays a major role in nutrition, digestion, inflammation, growth, immunity and protection against foreign pathogens (18, 19).
"These results show the potential of Cry5B to treat Ascaris infections in pigs and other livestock and to work effectively in the human gastrointestinal tract," says Urban.
The human gastrointestinal tract has been identified as one of the most densely populated part of the body with microbes (known collectively as the gut microbiota).
Salient in vivo studies in the human gastrointestinal tract using OCT are summarized in Table 1.
Inhabited by more than 100 trillion microorganisms, the human gastrointestinal tract is considered the most complex ecosystem on the planet.
The topics include interactions of food ingredients and nutraceutical delivery systems with the human gastrointestinal tract, fluid bed microencapsulation and other coating methods for food ingredient and nutraceutical bioactive compounds, liposomes as delivery systems, a business perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of different flavor delivery systems, and properties and applications of different probiotic delivery systems.
So our knowledge about the effect of oxidized oils after digestion in the human gastrointestinal tract is limited, if not non-existent.
E.coli are normal inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract and are the most frequently isolated bacteria from stools, while HUS is a life-threatening disease characterised by acute renal failure (uraemia), haemolytic anaemia and low platelet count.

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