Herpesviridae

(redirected from Human herpes virus)
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Herpesviridae

[‚hər·pēz′vir·ə‚dī]
(virology)
A family of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-containing viruses characterized by enveloped virions containing one molecule of double-stranded linear DNA wrapped around an associated spool-shaped protein inside an icosahedron. It includes subfamilies Alphaherpesvirinae (herpes simplex virus group), Betaherpesvirinae (cytomegalovirus group), and Gammaherpesvirinae (lymphoproliferative virus group).
References in periodicals archive ?
The protein is the key switch that regulates human herpes virus 8 replication.
Human herpes virus type 8 has been proven to be the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, both the classic AIDS-defining tumor and the Mediterranean Kaposi's sarcoma.
In addition, the risk of preterm birth was significantly higher in babies exposed to cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus 1, herpes simplex virus 2, Epstein-Barr virus, or human herpes virus 8.
First, using GFP-labeled human herpes virus (HSV1) as a tool, we reconstituted HSV transport in both directions in the squid axon.
Human herpes virus 8 (HHV8)--HHV8 is a virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, an unusual skin tumor usually found in HIV-infected men.
At times of stress or when in boarding kennels, these viruses would cause illness, much like the human herpes virus.
The human herpes virus family consists of eight currently known pathogens that represent the most frequent isolates in general laboratories (Koneman, Allen, Janda, Schreckenberger, & Winn, 1997).
Persistent viral infection theory has reported that patients may have chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection, chronic enterovirus (coxsackie virus) infection, human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6) infection, or human T-lymphotrophic virus type II (HTLV-II) retrovirus infection.
Add human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), a virus linked to an increased risk of Kaposi's sarcoma, to the growing list of microbial agents that can be transmitted through donor organs, according to a report in the November 19 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.