natural language

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Related to Human language: human language technology

natural language

[′nach·rəl ′laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A computer language whose rules reflect and describe current rather than prescribed usage; it is often loose and ambiguous in interpretation, meaning different things to different hearers.

natural language

(application)
A language spoken or written by humans, as opposed to a language use to program or communicate with computers. Natural language understanding is one of the hardest problems of artificial intelligence due to the complexity, irregularity and diversity of human language and the philosophical problems of meaning.

See also Pleuk grammar development system, proof.

An on-line demonstration.

New York U.

natural language

A human language, such as English, Spanish, French, German, Japanese and Russian. See natural language recognition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relational frame theory: A post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition.
Interacting with the Database in Human Language is very convenient and simplest way of accessing data, particularly for the Novice user (who does not know about SQL commands and procedures).
Two major approaches can be distinguished, roughly, in the evolutionary theory: a gestural basis for the development of human language and a visual coding.
The communicational system, found in nature, best able to do that is human language.
As one of several corporate contributors to the Human Language Technology Research Institute, a representative of Intervoice also serves on the Institute's advisory board.
This has led to speculation that on a subconscious level pet owners are trying to teach their dog or cat to understand human language.
Logist, a rules-based software, displays the organization's logic as rules written in natural human language.
I believe that the inner significance of speaking in tongues or praying in the spirit can be found in something virtually every spiritual tradition in human history teaches in one way or another: that the reality religious symbols strive to express ultimately defies even the most exalted human language.
The book contains eight chapters, plus an epilogue, bibliography, and index, and offers an excellent and wide-ranging discussion of Renaissance theories of language and the relationship of human language to the verbum Del.
Watson represents a significant advance in a computer's ability to understand context in human language - a technology with potential applications in such domains as medicine.
Objective: "The pioneering framework I propose for the analysis of the foundations of human language the Grammar of the Body is inspired by sign language.