monkeypox

(redirected from Human monkeypox)
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Related to Human monkeypox: Monkeypox virus

monkeypox

[′məŋ·kē‚päks]
(veterinary medicine)
An animal virus that causes a smallpox-like eruption but only rarely infects humans and has little potential for interhuman spread.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meyer H, Perrichot M, Stemmler M, Emmerich P, Schmitz H, Varaine F, Shungu R, Tshioko F, Formenty P (2002) Outbreaks of disease suspected of being due to human monkeypox virus infection in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2001.
Although no human monkeypox cases have been associated with contact with rodents from the April 9 shipment, these animals are considered to pose a continued risk for infection for other animals and humans.
During 2013, a total of 104 cases of human monkeypox illness were reported in the Bokungu Health Zone.
Human monkeypox and smallpox viruses: genomic comparison.
investigation, which indicate that this is the largest human monkeypox outbreak
Using remote sensing to map the risk of human monkeypox virus in the Congo Basin.
Detection of human monkeypox in the Republic of the Congo following intensive community education.
The number of human monkeypox cases associated with the epidemic described in this report exceeded the total of 37 sporadic cases previously detected in the Sankuru subregion, Kasai Oriental region, by active surveillance activities during 1981-1986 (2).
We reviewed the reported human monkeypox cases in Africa, which were georeferenced at the patient's residence village by using digital versions of 1:250,000 Joint Operational Graphic (www.
Several recent reviews have reported an increasing prevalence of human monkeypox since smallpox eradication and the cessation of vaccinia vaccination (20,21).
Human monkeypox is regularly reported in remote villages of central Africa near tropical rainforests where persons may have contact with infected animals (3-7).
Human monkeypox is a zoonotic disease found in remote areas of western and central sub-Saharan Africa and is an important public health issue in these areas (1,2).
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